An Examination of Health Status, Perception of Faculty Support, Posttraumatic Stress and Nursing Student Stress as Predictors of Student Nurse Academic Performance

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152304
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Examination of Health Status, Perception of Faculty Support, Posttraumatic Stress and Nursing Student Stress as Predictors of Student Nurse Academic Performance
Abstract:
An Examination of Health Status, Perception of Faculty Support, Posttraumatic Stress and Nursing Student Stress as Predictors of Student Nurse Academic Performance
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Britt, Robin B., EdD, RNC
P.I. Institution Name:Texas Woman's University
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Chris Hawkins, PhD, RN; Sandra K. Cesario, RNC, PhD; Ann T. Malecha, PhD, RN; and Michelle Delahunty Dorin, PhD, RN, CDE
[Symposium Presentation] Health status, posttraumatic stress, perceptions of faculty support and specific stress related to the nursing student role are variables thatá impact success of nursing students during their educational program. It is hypothesized that students with poorer health status, higher posttraumatic stress scores, poorer perceptions of faculty support and higher scores on student nurse stress will be more academically successful. This study is the first phase of a longitudinal, 4 year cohort study examining the relationship between stressors and student success. The population consisted of 125 junior nursing students entering aná baccalaureate program taught on two health science campuses located in two large metropolitan areas in the southwestern United States. Health status was measured by the SF-12 , the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Brief Symptom Inventory. Posttraumatic Stress was measured by the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) checklist, the Perceived Faculty Support scale measured perceptions of faculty support and the Student Nurse Stress Index measured general stress related to the nursing student role. Student success is measured by Grade Point Average, attrition, and semester absenteeism. At the beginning of Fall 2006, data collection commenced utilizing a standardized interview schedule containing study measures. Through face to face interviews, each of the 40 investigative team members gathered baseline data for a caseload of 3 to 5 students to be followed by repeated data collection at the end of the Fall and Spring semesters. Findings: Baseline data for the predictor variables have all been analyzed and additional fall and a spring data collection period will complete the first year study in looking at the predictorÆs influence on student success. Conclusions and Implications: Student nurse variables that can predict success in nursing academic programs are important to identify and may help faculty design specific programs for those at risk for academic failure.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Examination of Health Status, Perception of Faculty Support, Posttraumatic Stress and Nursing Student Stress as Predictors of Student Nurse Academic Performanceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152304-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Examination of Health Status, Perception of Faculty Support, Posttraumatic Stress and Nursing Student Stress as Predictors of Student Nurse Academic Performance</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Britt, Robin B., EdD, RNC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Texas Woman's University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rbritt@twu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Chris Hawkins, PhD, RN; Sandra K. Cesario, RNC, PhD; Ann T. Malecha, PhD, RN; and Michelle Delahunty Dorin, PhD, RN, CDE</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Symposium Presentation] Health status, posttraumatic stress, perceptions of faculty support and specific stress related to the nursing student role are variables that&aacute; impact success of nursing students during their educational program. It is hypothesized that students with poorer health status, higher posttraumatic stress scores, poorer perceptions of faculty support and higher scores on student nurse stress will be more academically successful. This study is the first phase of a longitudinal, 4 year cohort study examining the relationship between stressors and student success. The population consisted of 125 junior nursing students entering an&aacute; baccalaureate program taught on two health science campuses located in two large metropolitan areas in the southwestern United States. Health status was measured by the SF-12 , the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Brief Symptom Inventory. Posttraumatic Stress was measured by the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) checklist, the Perceived Faculty Support scale measured perceptions of faculty support and the Student Nurse Stress Index measured general stress related to the nursing student role. Student success is measured by Grade Point Average, attrition, and semester absenteeism. At the beginning of Fall 2006, data collection commenced utilizing a standardized interview schedule containing study measures. Through face to face interviews, each of the 40 investigative team members gathered baseline data for a caseload of 3 to 5 students to be followed by repeated data collection at the end of the Fall and Spring semesters. Findings: Baseline data for the predictor variables have all been analyzed and additional fall and a spring data collection period will complete the first year study in looking at the predictor&AElig;s influence on student success. Conclusions and Implications: Student nurse variables that can predict success in nursing academic programs are important to identify and may help faculty design specific programs for those at risk for academic failure.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:31:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:31:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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