Exploring Factors that Influence Operating Room Nurses' Error Reporting Preferences

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152337
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exploring Factors that Influence Operating Room Nurses' Error Reporting Preferences
Abstract:
Exploring Factors that Influence Operating Room Nurses' Error Reporting Preferences
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Espin, Sherry, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Ryerson University
Title:Associate Professor
[Symposium Presentation] As concern over the number of health care errors has risen, so has interest in the development of reporting mechanisms. However, the success of these reporting systems rests with individuals using them, and research has raised doubts about healthcare providers' willingness to report. Further, this research has focused on error reporting in the context of individual practice. As a consequence, we do not know whether these reporting tendencies and attitudes apply in team settings where responsibility for an error may reside with another discipline or may be diffused across the team. As many inpatient errors occur in team settings, it is important to understand how professionals collaborating on interdisciplinary teams perceive and respond to error reporting in their everyday practice. In a previous study, we began the process of characterizing nurses' error reporting preferences using scenarios from the OR team setting. Results demonstrated nurses' dominant rationale for selective reporting was the perceived boundaries set by their scope of practice. When nurses did report an error outside their domain of practice they justified their reporting in terms of the patient's negative outcome. However, the scenarios used in that study were not specifically designed to evoke or explicate these two sets of rationales. Thus, the purpose of this study was to explore the role of scope of practice and seriousness of outcome in OR nurses' error reporting preferences. In a grounded theory approach thirteen nurses were interviewed after reviewing four ôerrorö scenarios ranging in both scope of practice and seriousness of outcome. Qualitative analysis revealed that perceived scope of practice was an important influence on reporting preferences but that seriousness of outcome was at best a secondary consideration. Nurses' selective reporting and their reasons for this selectiveness have negative implications for safety, since many errors will likely go unreported.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExploring Factors that Influence Operating Room Nurses' Error Reporting Preferencesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152337-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Exploring Factors that Influence Operating Room Nurses' Error Reporting Preferences</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Espin, Sherry, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ryerson University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sespin@ryerson.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Symposium Presentation] As concern over the number of health care errors has risen, so has interest in the development of reporting mechanisms. However, the success of these reporting systems rests with individuals using them, and research has raised doubts about healthcare providers' willingness to report. Further, this research has focused on error reporting in the context of individual practice. As a consequence, we do not know whether these reporting tendencies and attitudes apply in team settings where responsibility for an error may reside with another discipline or may be diffused across the team. As many inpatient errors occur in team settings, it is important to understand how professionals collaborating on interdisciplinary teams perceive and respond to error reporting in their everyday practice. In a previous study, we began the process of characterizing nurses' error reporting preferences using scenarios from the OR team setting. Results demonstrated nurses' dominant rationale for selective reporting was the perceived boundaries set by their scope of practice. When nurses did report an error outside their domain of practice they justified their reporting in terms of the patient's negative outcome. However, the scenarios used in that study were not specifically designed to evoke or explicate these two sets of rationales. Thus, the purpose of this study was to explore the role of scope of practice and seriousness of outcome in OR nurses' error reporting preferences. In a grounded theory approach thirteen nurses were interviewed after reviewing four &ocirc;error&ouml; scenarios ranging in both scope of practice and seriousness of outcome. Qualitative analysis revealed that perceived scope of practice was an important influence on reporting preferences but that seriousness of outcome was at best a secondary consideration. Nurses' selective reporting and their reasons for this selectiveness have negative implications for safety, since many errors will likely go unreported.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:32:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:32:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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