Role Concerns, Sociological Model of Adaptation To Illness-Related Transitions And Mental Health In Midlife Women Experiencing Acute Myocardial Infarction

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152362
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Role Concerns, Sociological Model of Adaptation To Illness-Related Transitions And Mental Health In Midlife Women Experiencing Acute Myocardial Infarction
Abstract:
Role Concerns, Sociological Model of Adaptation To Illness-Related Transitions And Mental Health In Midlife Women Experiencing Acute Myocardial Infarction
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Kamm-Steigelman, Lucia, RN, PhD, MBA
P.I. Institution Name:Emory Healthcare
Title:Nursing Administrative Supervisor
Co-Authors:Nursing Administrative Supervisor
[Research Presentation] Background: Midlife women fulfill multiple roles in society including wage-earner, spouse/partner, homemaker, relative, caregiver to children/parents, and volunteer. Experiencing an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) influences roles as well as role concern, and offers the woman an opportunity to re-evaluate their life roles and initiate fundamental changes.áLittle research exists about the nature of role concern and changes over time. A sociological model of adaptation to illness-related transitions, including variables of personal characteristics, coping through religion, and baseline health characteristics, was used to examine the influence on AMI-related health outcomes. Purpose: This study described role concern and adaptation over time in mid-life women who experienced AMI and examined howárole concern influenced mental health outcomes when controlling for relevant personal and health characteristics. Sample: The convenience sample included 50 women, mean age 53.6 years +/-8.19 years. Method: A prospective, longitudinal design was used. Data were collected approximately one week following AMI with participants reporting pre-AMI status (Baseline) and again between 2 to 3 months post hospital discharge. Relationships among socioeconomic status (total family income), age, optimism (Life Orientation Test-Revised), comorbidities (Charlson Co-morbidities Index), severity of AMI (troponin level), role concern (Role Quality Measure), personal importance of religion (Index of Religiousness), baseline mental health and mental health outcomes (SF-36 Physical and Mental Health Summary Scales-Version 2) were examined using descriptive statistics, t tests and multiple regressions. Findings: Using multiple regression,árole concern predicted a significant amount of variance (change in R 2 of 5.5%, p<.05) in improved mental health outcomes after controlling for total family income, age, optimism, comorbidities, severity of AMI, personal importance of religion and baseline mental health. Discussion: Healthcare providers, as well as women themselves, should familiarize themselves with the sociological model to explain AMI recovery and encourage discussion about roles including both concerns and rewards.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRole Concerns, Sociological Model of Adaptation To Illness-Related Transitions And Mental Health In Midlife Women Experiencing Acute Myocardial Infarctionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152362-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Role Concerns, Sociological Model of Adaptation To Illness-Related Transitions And Mental Health In Midlife Women Experiencing Acute Myocardial Infarction</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kamm-Steigelman, Lucia, RN, PhD, MBA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Emory Healthcare</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing Administrative Supervisor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Lucia.Kamm-Steigelman@emoryhealthcare.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Nursing Administrative Supervisor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Background: Midlife women fulfill multiple roles in society including wage-earner, spouse/partner, homemaker, relative, caregiver to children/parents, and volunteer. Experiencing an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) influences roles as well as role concern, and offers the woman an opportunity to re-evaluate their life roles and initiate fundamental changes.&aacute;Little research exists about the nature of role concern and changes over time. A sociological model of adaptation to illness-related transitions, including variables of personal characteristics, coping through religion, and baseline health characteristics, was used to examine the influence on AMI-related health outcomes. Purpose: This study described role concern and adaptation over time in mid-life women who experienced AMI and examined how&aacute;role concern influenced mental health outcomes when controlling for relevant personal and health characteristics. Sample: The convenience sample included 50 women, mean age 53.6 years +/-8.19 years. Method: A prospective, longitudinal design was used. Data were collected approximately one week following AMI with participants reporting pre-AMI status (Baseline) and again between 2 to 3 months post hospital discharge. Relationships among socioeconomic status (total family income), age, optimism (Life Orientation Test-Revised), comorbidities (Charlson Co-morbidities Index), severity of AMI (troponin level), role concern (Role Quality Measure), personal importance of religion (Index of Religiousness), baseline mental health and mental health outcomes (SF-36 Physical and Mental Health Summary Scales-Version 2) were examined using descriptive statistics, t tests and multiple regressions. Findings: Using multiple regression,&aacute;role concern predicted a significant amount of variance (change in R 2 of 5.5%, p&lt;.05) in improved mental health outcomes after controlling for total family income, age, optimism, comorbidities, severity of AMI, personal importance of religion and baseline mental health. Discussion: Healthcare providers, as well as women themselves, should familiarize themselves with the sociological model to explain AMI recovery and encourage discussion about roles including both concerns and rewards.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:33:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:33:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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