2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152377
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Neglect of Teaching for Alzheimer Families: A Qualitative Metasynthesis
Abstract:
The Neglect of Teaching for Alzheimer Families: A Qualitative Metasynthesis
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:LeNavenec, Carole Lynne, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Calgary
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Sandra P. Hirst, RN, PhD, GNC(C) and Annette Lane, RN, PhD(C)
[Evidence-based Presentation] Background: over the last several decades, increasingly the attention of nurses has turned towards care of older adults with Alzheimer's Disease and those important to them. The focus of this study was to review literature on how the lived experience of being taught for family members of Alzheimer clients was described in the nursing and allied health literature between 1995 and 2005, and to interpret and discuss the results from the perspective of theories on family caregiving needs. Methods: studies were retrieved via computerized literature searches, cross-referencing from original and review articles, and a review of the reference list by three recognized gerontological nurses. The inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) reporting care of Alzheimer clients and those important to them; (2) published in the English language; (3) indexed between January 1996 and December 2005; (4) research (defined as those containing a statement of purpose and a description of methods and findings, regardless of whether such heading labels were used); (5) learning needs identified/implied (defined as the information that caregivers require to provide care to the Alzheimer member); and (6) education/teaching intervention identified/implied. Findings: the frequent reports of families needing information, choices, and control over decision making are pathways whereby they maintain their ability to provide care for their older members. At the same time, findings indicated that while information is provided, teaching is often neglected. However, when findings are interpreted from the perspective of caregiving and gerontological nursing models, teaching interventions are understood as essential to promote family caregiving and to reduce perceived burden. Discussion and Conclusion: it is important that more rigorous and consistent research be applied to gain a greater understanding of how to enhance the responsibility for teaching by nurses. Some suggestions towards achieving this are offered.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Neglect of Teaching for Alzheimer Families: A Qualitative Metasynthesisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152377-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Neglect of Teaching for Alzheimer Families: A Qualitative Metasynthesis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">LeNavenec, Carole Lynne, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Calgary</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cllenave@ucalgary.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sandra P. Hirst, RN, PhD, GNC(C) and Annette Lane, RN, PhD(C)</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Evidence-based Presentation] Background: over the last several decades, increasingly the attention of nurses has turned towards care of older adults with Alzheimer's Disease and those important to them. The focus of this study was to review literature on how the lived experience of being taught for family members of Alzheimer clients was described in the nursing and allied health literature between 1995 and 2005, and to interpret and discuss the results from the perspective of theories on family caregiving needs. Methods: studies were retrieved via computerized literature searches, cross-referencing from original and review articles, and a review of the reference list by three recognized gerontological nurses. The inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) reporting care of Alzheimer clients and those important to them; (2) published in the English language; (3) indexed between January 1996 and December 2005; (4) research (defined as those containing a statement of purpose and a description of methods and findings, regardless of whether such heading labels were used); (5) learning needs identified/implied (defined as the information that caregivers require to provide care to the Alzheimer member); and (6) education/teaching intervention identified/implied. Findings: the frequent reports of families needing information, choices, and control over decision making are pathways whereby they maintain their ability to provide care for their older members. At the same time, findings indicated that while information is provided, teaching is often neglected. However, when findings are interpreted from the perspective of caregiving and gerontological nursing models, teaching interventions are understood as essential to promote family caregiving and to reduce perceived burden. Discussion and Conclusion: it is important that more rigorous and consistent research be applied to gain a greater understanding of how to enhance the responsibility for teaching by nurses. Some suggestions towards achieving this are offered.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:33:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:33:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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