Abstinence Education Versus Comprehensive Sexual Education: Interpretations by Adolescent Focus Groups

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152382
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Abstinence Education Versus Comprehensive Sexual Education: Interpretations by Adolescent Focus Groups
Abstract:
Abstinence Education Versus Comprehensive Sexual Education: Interpretations by Adolescent Focus Groups
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Butts, Janie B., DSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Southern Mississippi
Title:Associate Professor
The purpose is to determine through focus group interviews of adolescents (a) the meaning of sexual abstinence and (b) the value of sexual education prevention programs, specifically abstinence-only versus comprehensive, safe sex prevention programs. The perceptions of at-risk male and female teens in residence at the Youth Challenge Program at Camp Shelby, Mississippi will be used. BackgroundùHeterosexual transmission continues to be the predominant mode of transmission in the rural South, particularly Mississippi, (Hu et al., 1992). Traditionally teens have equated ôhaving sexö with intercourse alone. A focus in research and prevention has been on teens and reducing risky behaviors. Teens have sought more creative ways to express sexual intimacy, such as mutual masturbation, oral and anal sex (Remez, 2000). These behaviors are not considered ôsexö in the traditional sense yet some non-traditional behaviors, when unprotected, can lead to HIV/STDs. The term ôsexual abstinenceö among teens has lead to ambiguous opinions. Clarity of ôsexual abstinenceö needs to be communicated. Teens need answers to these questions: Is abstinence not having vaginal penetration, or anal penetration? Is abstinence only referring to no vaginal intercourse? Could abstinence be defined these days as simply not exchanging body fluids? There are numerous studies on HIV/STDs and abstinence-only versus comprehensive safe sex prevention programs. MethodùTwo 90-minute focus groups with 8 teens in each group were interviewed, one group each of males and females, totaling 16 participants. FindingsùThemes included sexual abstinence may not mean the same for everyone; just say no doesn't work because teens need more explanation as to what will work; teach comprehensive sexual education starting at the 4th grade (this was prominent), and several more.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAbstinence Education Versus Comprehensive Sexual Education: Interpretations by Adolescent Focus Groupsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152382-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Abstinence Education Versus Comprehensive Sexual Education: Interpretations by Adolescent Focus Groups</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Butts, Janie B., DSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Southern Mississippi</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jbondbutts@comcast.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose is to determine through focus group interviews of adolescents (a) the meaning of sexual abstinence and (b) the value of sexual education prevention programs, specifically abstinence-only versus comprehensive, safe sex prevention programs. The perceptions of at-risk male and female teens in residence at the Youth Challenge Program at Camp Shelby, Mississippi will be used. Background&ugrave;Heterosexual transmission continues to be the predominant mode of transmission in the rural South, particularly Mississippi, (Hu et al., 1992). Traditionally teens have equated &ocirc;having sex&ouml; with intercourse alone. A focus in research and prevention has been on teens and reducing risky behaviors. Teens have sought more creative ways to express sexual intimacy, such as mutual masturbation, oral and anal sex (Remez, 2000). These behaviors are not considered &ocirc;sex&ouml; in the traditional sense yet some non-traditional behaviors, when unprotected, can lead to HIV/STDs. The term &ocirc;sexual abstinence&ouml; among teens has lead to ambiguous opinions. Clarity of &ocirc;sexual abstinence&ouml; needs to be communicated. Teens need answers to these questions: Is abstinence not having vaginal penetration, or anal penetration? Is abstinence only referring to no vaginal intercourse? Could abstinence be defined these days as simply not exchanging body fluids? There are numerous studies on HIV/STDs and abstinence-only versus comprehensive safe sex prevention programs. Method&ugrave;Two 90-minute focus groups with 8 teens in each group were interviewed, one group each of males and females, totaling 16 participants. Findings&ugrave;Themes included sexual abstinence may not mean the same for everyone; just say no doesn't work because teens need more explanation as to what will work; teach comprehensive sexual education starting at the 4th grade (this was prominent), and several more.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:34:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:34:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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