Nursing in the Native American Indian and National Alaskan Native (indigenous) Cultures

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152406
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing in the Native American Indian and National Alaskan Native (indigenous) Cultures
Abstract:
Nursing in the Native American Indian and National Alaskan Native (indigenous) Cultures
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Crow, Karine, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Northern Arizona University
Title:Associate Professor, Coordinator, NAU Nursing Navajo-Hopi Program
Co-Authors:John R. Lowe, RN, PhD
Health disparities are major concerns among indigenous populations within the United States (US). The nursing shortage will continue to impact health care to indigenous populations and the existing health disparities will continue to increase. Data from the Department of Health and Human Services report that only .5% of the total US population are self-identified as indigenous nurses. These nurses serve 4.1 million indigenous people; a population that is growing at a rate of 2% per year. The following selected statistics demonstrate the alarming health disparities that exist among indigenous populations: Infant mortality rate of 1.5x higher than Whites Diabetes 2x the total population Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death Mortality/injuries related to alcohol and substance abuse exceed the rates of other populations HIV/AIDS steadily increasing at alarming rates. Many health related statistics for indigenous people are not recorded or noted. These health issues alone indicate the need for nursing care that is culturally competent and cultural specific. Theoretical models have been developed and published that discuss research, educational and practice issues/concepts related to these populations. Presently, a pilot study is being conducted that utilizes an exemplar multiple case-study design that will continue to define and validate concepts related to cultural competent nursing practice to these indigenous populations. The findings will continue to provide valuable information on how to integrate indigenous life-ways, traditional healing practices into the western modalities of contemporary health care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing in the Native American Indian and National Alaskan Native (indigenous) Culturesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152406-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing in the Native American Indian and National Alaskan Native (indigenous) Cultures</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Crow, Karine, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northern Arizona University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor, Coordinator, NAU Nursing Navajo-Hopi Program</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">karine.crow@nau.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">John R. Lowe, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Health disparities are major concerns among indigenous populations within the United States (US). The nursing shortage will continue to impact health care to indigenous populations and the existing health disparities will continue to increase. Data from the Department of Health and Human Services report that only .5% of the total US population are self-identified as indigenous nurses. These nurses serve 4.1 million indigenous people; a population that is growing at a rate of 2% per year. The following selected statistics demonstrate the alarming health disparities that exist among indigenous populations: Infant mortality rate of 1.5x higher than Whites Diabetes 2x the total population Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death Mortality/injuries related to alcohol and substance abuse exceed the rates of other populations HIV/AIDS steadily increasing at alarming rates. Many health related statistics for indigenous people are not recorded or noted. These health issues alone indicate the need for nursing care that is culturally competent and cultural specific. Theoretical models have been developed and published that discuss research, educational and practice issues/concepts related to these populations. Presently, a pilot study is being conducted that utilizes an exemplar multiple case-study design that will continue to define and validate concepts related to cultural competent nursing practice to these indigenous populations. The findings will continue to provide valuable information on how to integrate indigenous life-ways, traditional healing practices into the western modalities of contemporary health care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:35:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:35:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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