2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152413
Type:
Presentation
Title:
"We are not Male Nurses": Perceptions of Men in Nursing
Abstract:
"We are not Male Nurses": Perceptions of Men in Nursing
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Baumberger-Henry, Mary, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:Widener University
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Barbara J. Patterson, PhD, RN
Recommendations and strategies for recruitment of males into nursing have been discussed in the literature for over a decade; however, males still only constitute about six percent of the nursing workforce. The main purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of how male nurses and nursing students perceive nursing as a career.  A secondary purpose was to determine what factors influenced these nurses or students in their selection of a nursing program.  The research design was qualitative description. Two groups of participants were accessed, male nursing students (n=10) and male registered nurses (n=9). The age range for students was 19-38 years and RNs, 27-54 years.   Demographic data was obtained on all participants. Three focus groups were conducted with the students and individual semi-structured interviews with the RNs. Data were collected until saturated with simultaneous data analysis. A qualitative computer program was used to assist with data management and analysis. Participant responses were analyzed for common themes and patterns.  Descriptive statistics were used to summarize demographics.    Wanting to work with and help people and transitioning from other helping professions were two themes that emerged as reasons why men choose nursing. Of significance, the language of ?helping? superseded ?caring?.  Personal satisfaction, growth/ advancement, work environment and salary were influencing to remain in nursing. Faculty interaction was key in selection of a nursing program. Striving for a genderless profession was a common thread.   While the reasons why men enter the profession are consistent with themes that have been previously reported, few advances in the recruitment of larger numbers of males into nursing have occurred. Perhaps it is time to revisit recruitment strategies and re-conceptualize nursing as a genderless helping profession.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.title"We are not Male Nurses": Perceptions of Men in Nursingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152413-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">&quot;We are not Male Nurses&quot;: Perceptions of Men in Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Baumberger-Henry, Mary, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Widener University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mlbaumberger-henry@mail.widener.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Barbara J. Patterson, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Recommendations and strategies for recruitment of males into nursing have been discussed in the literature for over a decade; however, males still only constitute about six percent of the nursing workforce. The main purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of how male nurses and nursing students perceive nursing as a career.&nbsp; A secondary purpose was to determine what factors influenced these nurses or students in their selection of a nursing program.&nbsp; The research design was qualitative description. Two groups of participants were accessed, male nursing students (n=10) and male registered nurses (n=9). The age range for students was 19-38 years and RNs, 27-54 years. &nbsp; Demographic data was obtained on all participants. Three focus groups were conducted with the students and individual semi-structured interviews with the RNs. Data were collected until saturated with simultaneous data analysis. A qualitative computer program was used to assist with data management and analysis. Participant responses were analyzed for common themes and patterns.&nbsp; Descriptive statistics were used to summarize demographics.&nbsp; &nbsp; Wanting to work with and help people and transitioning from other helping professions were two themes that emerged as reasons why men choose nursing. Of significance, the language of ?helping? superseded ?caring?.&nbsp; Personal satisfaction, growth/ advancement, work environment and salary were influencing to remain in nursing. Faculty interaction was key in selection of a nursing program. Striving for a genderless profession was a common thread. &nbsp; While the reasons why men enter the profession are consistent with themes that have been previously reported, few advances in the recruitment of larger numbers of males into nursing have occurred. Perhaps it is time to revisit recruitment strategies and re-conceptualize nursing as a genderless helping profession.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:35:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:35:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.