Identifying Optimal Levels of Compression to Promote Healing in Chronic Venous Leg Ulcers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152450
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Identifying Optimal Levels of Compression to Promote Healing in Chronic Venous Leg Ulcers
Abstract:
Identifying Optimal Levels of Compression to Promote Healing in Chronic Venous Leg Ulcers
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Edwards, Helen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Mary Courtney, PhD; Peter O'Shea, PhD; Mark Pearcy, PhD; Kathleen Finlayson, BN, MNsg
Purpose: The aim of this study is to identify the relationships between progress in wound healing, levels of compression and types of compression systems for clients with chronic leg ulcers. Chronic leg ulcers occur in approximately 3% of those aged over 60 years, with incidence increasing with age. Although multilayered compression bandaging systems are known to be effective in promoting healing in venous leg ulcers, the optimal type, amount of pressure and length of time necessary to obtain best healing outcomes are unknown. The use of these compression systems involve many costs, including long term purchase of expensive bandages, discomfort and inconvenience associated with wearing bulky pressure bandages and the significant amounts of time, specialised training and staff needed to apply the systems. Answers to these questions are thus of significant importance to both health care professionals and sufferers of chronic leg ulcers. Methods: This paper reports results from a sample of 90 participants with chronic venous leg ulcers recruited in South-East Queensland, Australia. Measures on progress in wound healing, dressings and type and level of compression were collected every 4 weeks for 24 weeks. Data were also collected on general health, venous medical history and ulcer history at baseline. Chi square analysis and analysis of variance was undertaken to analyse differences in measures of healing between groups receiving less than 25mmHg, those receiving between 25 ? 35mmHg and those receiving over 35mmHg compression at the ankle. Results and Conclusion: Significant differences in measures of healing were found between the group receiving less than 25mmHg and the two groups receiving over 25mmHg, but no significant difference was found between the moderately high and high compression groups. These results have significant clinical implications and provide information to guide clinicians caring for clients with chronic leg ulcers in their treatment decisions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIdentifying Optimal Levels of Compression to Promote Healing in Chronic Venous Leg Ulcersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152450-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Identifying Optimal Levels of Compression to Promote Healing in Chronic Venous Leg Ulcers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Edwards, Helen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">h.edwards@qut.edu.au</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary Courtney, PhD; Peter O'Shea, PhD; Mark Pearcy, PhD; Kathleen Finlayson, BN, MNsg</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The aim of this study is to identify the relationships between progress in wound healing, levels of compression and types of compression systems for clients with chronic leg ulcers. Chronic leg ulcers occur in approximately 3% of those aged over 60 years, with incidence increasing with age. Although multilayered compression bandaging systems are known to be effective in promoting healing in venous leg ulcers, the optimal type, amount of pressure and length of time necessary to obtain best healing outcomes are unknown. The use of these compression systems involve many costs, including long term purchase of expensive bandages, discomfort and inconvenience associated with wearing bulky pressure bandages and the significant amounts of time, specialised training and staff needed to apply the systems. Answers to these questions are thus of significant importance to both health care professionals and sufferers of chronic leg ulcers. Methods: This paper reports results from a sample of 90 participants with chronic venous leg ulcers recruited in South-East Queensland, Australia. Measures on progress in wound healing, dressings and type and level of compression were collected every 4 weeks for 24 weeks. Data were also collected on general health, venous medical history and ulcer history at baseline. Chi square analysis and analysis of variance was undertaken to analyse differences in measures of healing between groups receiving less than 25mmHg, those receiving between 25 ? 35mmHg and those receiving over 35mmHg compression at the ankle. Results and Conclusion:&nbsp;Significant differences in measures of healing were found between the group receiving less than 25mmHg and the two groups receiving over 25mmHg, but no significant difference was found between the moderately high and high compression groups. These results have significant clinical implications and provide information to guide clinicians caring for clients with chronic leg ulcers in their treatment decisions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:36:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:36:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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