2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152458
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Migraine Headache: Improving Diagnosis
Abstract:
Migraine Headache: Improving Diagnosis
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Grossman, Sheila Carey, APRN, FNP, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Fairfield University
Title:Professor & Nurse Practitioner
Migraine Headache: Improving Diagnosis Objective:  The purpose was to identify the prevalence of headaches, assess patient management, and to identify interventions to improve diagnosing migraines. Migraine affects 1 in 10 adults and decreases work performance exponentially (Brandes, Saper, Diamone, et al, 2004). 14 million Americans are undiagnosed or misdiagnosed (HIS, 2004). Studies indicate the importance of using preventive/abortive medication as early as possible to have the most impact (Wright, 2005; Diamond, 2005). Sample & Setting: The sample consists of 291 young adults, aged 18- 24, seen by nurse practitioners at an urban northeastern university clinic. Methodology: A researcher-developed checklist (symptoms, family history, number of visits for same diagnosis, co-morbidities, treatment, and response to treatment[s]) was used to collect data for this retrospective study. Findings: Case analysis of 389 chart entries of 291 student charts revealed the individualized assessment of symptoms, presence/absence of family history, co-morbidities, and treatment. There was a 35% lack of treatment response noted. NSAIDS were used 69%, tryptans 22%, and the remaining 9% included anti-epileptics, beta blockers, and complementary medicine. 66% were women and 34% were men. 34% returned for further work-up. Diaries were used 17% of the time. No consistent pattern of co-morbidities was identified. Only 41% were diagnosed with migraine, 1% with cluster, 35% with tension, 22% with sinus headache, and 1% were attributed to trauma. Students missed multiple activities and felt the headaches negatively impacted their college success. The primary complaint included not knowing when a headache would occur followed by feeling dependent on drugs, and fearful of ramifications of headaches. Conclusions: Using patient diaries, diagnostic assessment tools (Lipton, Dodick, Sadovsky, et al, 2003), and scheduling follow-up visits to track effectiveness of treatment generated improved identification of migraineurs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMigraine Headache: Improving Diagnosisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152458-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Migraine Headache: Improving Diagnosis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Grossman, Sheila Carey, APRN, FNP, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Fairfield University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor &amp; Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Sgrossman@mail.fairfield.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Migraine Headache: Improving Diagnosis Objective:&nbsp; The purpose was to identify the prevalence of headaches, assess patient management, and to identify interventions to improve diagnosing migraines. Migraine affects 1 in 10 adults and decreases work performance exponentially (Brandes, Saper, Diamone, et al, 2004). 14 million Americans are undiagnosed or misdiagnosed (HIS, 2004). Studies indicate the importance of using preventive/abortive medication as early as possible to have the most impact (Wright, 2005; Diamond, 2005). Sample &amp; Setting: The sample consists of 291 young adults, aged 18- 24, seen by nurse practitioners at an urban northeastern university clinic. Methodology: A researcher-developed checklist (symptoms, family history, number of visits for same diagnosis, co-morbidities, treatment, and response to treatment[s]) was used to collect data for this retrospective study. Findings: Case analysis of 389 chart entries of 291 student charts revealed the individualized assessment of symptoms, presence/absence of family history, co-morbidities, and treatment. There was a 35% lack of treatment response noted. NSAIDS were used 69%, tryptans 22%, and the remaining 9% included anti-epileptics, beta blockers, and complementary medicine. 66% were women and 34% were men. 34% returned for further work-up. Diaries were used 17% of the time. No consistent pattern of co-morbidities was identified. Only 41% were diagnosed with migraine, 1% with cluster, 35% with tension, 22% with sinus headache, and 1% were attributed to trauma. Students missed multiple activities and felt the headaches negatively impacted their college success. The primary complaint included not knowing when a headache would occur followed by feeling dependent on drugs, and fearful of ramifications of headaches. Conclusions: Using patient diaries, diagnostic assessment tools (Lipton, Dodick, Sadovsky, et al, 2003), and scheduling follow-up visits to track effectiveness of treatment generated improved identification of migraineurs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:37:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:37:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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