Routine Replacement of Peripheral Intravenous Catheters (IVs) Every 96 Hours: Evidence for Practice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152459
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Routine Replacement of Peripheral Intravenous Catheters (IVs) Every 96 Hours: Evidence for Practice
Abstract:
Routine Replacement of Peripheral Intravenous Catheters (IVs) Every 96 Hours: Evidence for Practice
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Hagle, Mary, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Aurora Health Care
Title:Manager/Nursing Practice Specialist
Co-Authors:Lee Jeske, MS; Terri Pawlak, RN, CRRN
A national guideline recommendation was made for routine replacement of peripheral IVs every 72-96 hours yet more recent research was available and an updated summary of study findings was needed. Therefore, an integrative review was conducted to provide a comprehensive presentation of the research and make a practice recommendation for a system of acute care hospitals. Routine replacement of peripheral IVs every 96 hours was shown to have no more risks than IVs replaced every 72 hours. Several studies supported this finding, although a variety of outcome measures were used. One study used three outcome measures, including phlebitis assessment, catheter-related infection identified through colonization, and obstruction. The remaining studies all used observation of the IV for phlebitis although each study used a different tool. Sample sizes ranged from 34 to 2,503 catheters. Even though phlebitis rates ranged from a low of 2.6% to 19.7%, all authors recommended routine replacement at least after 72 hours or longer. Based on the literature review, a practice change was approved for 96-hour routine replacement.  Before implementation, a one-day prevalence survey of all hospitalized patients with peripheral IVs was done.  IVs were assessed for phlebitis using a modification of one published tool; all cases of suspected phlebitis were reviewed by two observers for scoring and then reported to the patient's nurse for IV change if needed. Phlebitis rates ranged from 0% to 2.3%. Once the practice change was implemented, two follow-up surveys were done. Phlebitis rates ranged from 0% to 1.25%. Routine replacement every 96 hours did not increase the risk of phlebitis. A growing body of evidence supports the routine replacement of peripheral IVs every 96 hours without putting patient safety at risk. Standardizing a phlebitis assessment tool would be most helpful for future work.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRoutine Replacement of Peripheral Intravenous Catheters (IVs) Every 96 Hours: Evidence for Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152459-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Routine Replacement of Peripheral Intravenous Catheters (IVs) Every 96 Hours: Evidence for Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hagle, Mary, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Aurora Health Care</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Manager/Nursing Practice Specialist</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mary.hagle@aurora.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lee Jeske, MS; Terri Pawlak, RN, CRRN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A national guideline recommendation was made for routine replacement of peripheral IVs every 72-96 hours yet more recent research was available and an updated summary of study findings was needed. Therefore, an integrative review was conducted to provide a comprehensive presentation of the research and make a practice recommendation for a system of acute care hospitals. Routine replacement of peripheral IVs every 96 hours was shown to have no more risks than IVs replaced every 72 hours. Several studies supported this finding, although a variety of outcome measures were used. One study used three outcome measures, including phlebitis assessment, catheter-related infection identified through colonization, and obstruction. The remaining studies all used observation of the IV for phlebitis although each study used a different tool. Sample sizes ranged from 34 to 2,503 catheters. Even though phlebitis rates ranged from a low of 2.6% to 19.7%, all authors recommended routine replacement at least after 72 hours or longer. Based on the literature review, a practice change was approved for 96-hour routine replacement.&nbsp; Before implementation, a one-day prevalence survey of all hospitalized patients with peripheral IVs was done.&nbsp; IVs were assessed for phlebitis using a modification of one published tool; all cases of suspected phlebitis were reviewed by two observers for scoring and then reported to the patient's nurse for IV change if needed. Phlebitis rates ranged from 0% to 2.3%. Once the practice change was implemented, two follow-up surveys were done. Phlebitis rates ranged from 0% to 1.25%. Routine replacement every 96 hours did not increase the risk of phlebitis. A growing body of evidence supports the routine replacement of peripheral IVs every 96 hours without putting patient safety at risk. Standardizing a phlebitis assessment tool would be most helpful for future work.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:37:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:37:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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