2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152460
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exercise and Pregnancy: What Does the Research Really Say?
Abstract:
Exercise and Pregnancy: What Does the Research Really Say?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Halloran, Laurel, PhD, APRN
P.I. Institution Name:Western CT State University
Title:MSN Coordinator
Changing lifestyles and attitudes have led to increased participation by women in vigorous exercise and sports. As a result, many questions have been raised about the continuation of these activities during pregnancy. The scant amount of research offers divergent and often conflicting opinions on the amount of exercise which is safe and best for both the expectant mother and fetus. When the stress of strenuous physical activity is superimposed upon that of pregnancy, the metabolic demands of the gravida uterus may come in conflict with those of the exercising muscles. In addition, there is question whether pregnancy related ligament laxity may cause joint instability. This may result in reduced exercise performance of the mother and/or adverse effects to the fetus including acute fetal distress. With the increasing importance placed on physical fitness, the clinician is faced with many questions. This review will examine research regarding exercise and pregnancy current research literature. In addition it will review research regarding the effects of exercise on maternal fitness, fetal heart rate, duration of labor and fetal size.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExercise and Pregnancy: What Does the Research Really Say?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152460-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Exercise and Pregnancy: What Does the Research Really Say?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Halloran, Laurel, PhD, APRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Western CT State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">MSN Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">halloranl@wcsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Changing lifestyles and attitudes have led to increased participation by women in vigorous exercise and sports. As a result, many questions have been raised about the continuation of these activities during pregnancy. The scant amount of research offers divergent and often conflicting opinions on the amount of exercise which is safe and best for both the expectant mother and fetus. When the stress of strenuous physical activity is superimposed upon that of pregnancy, the metabolic demands of the gravida uterus may come in conflict with those of the exercising muscles. In addition, there is question whether pregnancy related ligament laxity may cause joint instability. This may result in reduced exercise performance of the mother and/or adverse effects to the fetus including acute fetal distress. With the increasing importance placed on physical fitness, the clinician is faced with many questions. This review will examine research regarding exercise and pregnancy current research literature. In addition it will review research regarding the effects of exercise on maternal fitness, fetal heart rate, duration of labor and fetal size.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:37:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:37:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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