Why are Rural School-Age Children with Asthma Having High Hospitalizations and Emergency Department Visits?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152469
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Why are Rural School-Age Children with Asthma Having High Hospitalizations and Emergency Department Visits?
Abstract:
Why are Rural School-Age Children with Asthma Having High Hospitalizations and Emergency Department Visits?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Horner, Sharon, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Texas at Austin
Title:Associate Professor
Asthma is the most common chronic illness of childhood. In a tri-ethnic rural sample [Hispanic (49%), African American (24%), and White (27%)] of school-age children (n = 94) who have asthma, a large portion of the children had been hospitalized (18.4%) or seen in the emergency department (ED: 30.6%) for asthma in the preceding 12 months. The purpose of the present analysis was to examine those factors that may be contributing to this higher health care utilization. Significantly more boys (25.4%) than girls (7.7%) [p = .026]; more Hispanic (13%) than African American (5%) or White (1%) children [p = .034]; and more children who did not have bronchodilator medication [p = .047] were hospitalized for asthma. Hospitalized children had more severe asthma (p = .04) and more visits to the ED (p <.001) than those who were not hospitalized. There was a non-significant trend for children with lower socioeconomic status (p = .09) and no insurance [p = .10] to have more hospitalizations. Parent asthma management, reported barriers to care, and children?s absenteeism were not significantly different between children who were and were not hospitalized. However, absenteeism was much higher among boys than girls (6% v 3.2%) and higher among Hispanics (6.7%) than African Americans (3.6%) or Whites (3.8%). Implications from this analysis include the need for health care providers and school nurses to ensure that children have rescue medications, and assess risk factors such as ED visits and asthma severity. Increasing school absences may serve as a warning flag to alert school nurses to the need to monitor children closely for emerging problems with asthma.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhy are Rural School-Age Children with Asthma Having High Hospitalizations and Emergency Department Visits?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152469-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Why are Rural School-Age Children with Asthma Having High Hospitalizations and Emergency Department Visits?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Horner, Sharon, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Texas at Austin</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">s.horner@mail.utexas.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Asthma is the most common chronic illness of childhood. In a tri-ethnic rural sample [Hispanic (49%), African American (24%), and White (27%)] of school-age children (n = 94) who have asthma, a large portion of the children had been hospitalized (18.4%) or seen in the emergency department (ED: 30.6%) for asthma in the preceding 12 months. The purpose of the present analysis was to examine those factors that may be contributing to this higher health care utilization. Significantly more boys (25.4%) than girls (7.7%) [p = .026]; more Hispanic (13%) than African American (5%) or White (1%) children [p = .034]; and more children who did not have bronchodilator medication [p = .047] were hospitalized for asthma. Hospitalized children had more severe asthma (p = .04) and more visits to the ED (p &lt;.001) than those who were not hospitalized. There was a non-significant trend for children with lower socioeconomic status (p = .09) and no insurance [p = .10] to have more hospitalizations. Parent asthma management, reported barriers to care, and children?s absenteeism were not significantly different between children who were and were not hospitalized. However, absenteeism was much higher among boys than girls (6% v 3.2%) and higher among Hispanics (6.7%) than African Americans (3.6%) or Whites (3.8%). Implications from this analysis include the need for health care providers and school nurses to ensure that children have rescue medications, and assess risk factors such as ED visits and asthma severity. Increasing school absences may serve as a warning flag to alert school nurses to the need to monitor children closely for emerging problems with asthma.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:37:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:37:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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