Effects of a Full-Body Massage on Pain Intensity, Anxiety, and Physiologic Relaxation in Taiwanese Patients with Metastatic Bone Pain

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152475
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of a Full-Body Massage on Pain Intensity, Anxiety, and Physiologic Relaxation in Taiwanese Patients with Metastatic Bone Pain
Abstract:
Effects of a Full-Body Massage on Pain Intensity, Anxiety, and Physiologic Relaxation in Taiwanese Patients with Metastatic Bone Pain
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Jane, Sui-Whi, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Chang Gung Institute of Technology
Title:Associate Professor
Bone involvement is a hallmark of advanced disease, afflicting 34% to 45% of cancer patients in terms of intolerable pain, substantial morbidity and disruptive quality of life. Most investigators demonstrate immediate or short-term effects of massage on general cancer-related pain. Little is known about the feasibility, safety, and time effects of massage therapy  in Taiwanese patients with metastatic bone pain. The purpose of this study was to describe the feasibility of implementing a full-body MT in 30 Taiwanese hospitalized patients with metastatic bone pain and to examine the trends in time effects of massage on present pain intensity (PPI), anxiety, and physiological relaxation over a 16 to 18 hour period.   A quasi-experimental one-group pretest-posttest design with repeated measures was employed to examine the time effects of massage using a single item of PPI-VAS and Anxiety-VAS, the modified Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (MSF-MPQ), heart rate (HR), and mean arterial pressure (MAP).   Massage was shown to have effective immediate, short-term (20 to 30 min), intermediate (1 to 2.5 hours), and long-term benefits (16 to 18 hours) on PPI and anxiety. The most significant impact on measures employed occurred 15 or 20 minutes after the intervention. There were no significant time effects in terms of decreases or increases in HR and MAP. Caution is suggested in the interpretation of study findings due to the convenience sampling, small sample size, and the quasi-experimental design employed. Importantly, this study demonstrated the feasibility of implementing a full-body MT and its acceptability to patients with bone pain. Massage resulted in subjective reports of relaxation, enhanced comfort, and less cancer-related pain and anxiety, and improved sleep. No patient reported any adverse effects as a result of the study procedures. Future studies are suggested for randomized clinical trials to validate the effectiveness of MT in this cancer population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of a Full-Body Massage on Pain Intensity, Anxiety, and Physiologic Relaxation in Taiwanese Patients with Metastatic Bone Painen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152475-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of a Full-Body Massage on Pain Intensity, Anxiety, and Physiologic Relaxation in Taiwanese Patients with Metastatic Bone Pain</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jane, Sui-Whi, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Chang Gung Institute of Technology</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">swjane@gw.cgit.edu.tw</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Bone involvement is a hallmark of advanced disease, afflicting 34% to 45% of cancer patients in terms of intolerable pain, substantial morbidity and disruptive quality of life. Most investigators demonstrate immediate or short-term effects of massage on general cancer-related pain. Little is known about the feasibility, safety, and time effects of massage therapy&nbsp; in Taiwanese patients with metastatic bone pain. The purpose of this study was to describe the feasibility of implementing a full-body MT in 30 Taiwanese hospitalized patients with metastatic bone pain and to examine the trends in time effects of massage on present pain intensity (PPI), anxiety, and physiological relaxation over a 16 to 18 hour period. &nbsp; A quasi-experimental one-group pretest-posttest design with repeated measures was employed to examine the time effects of massage using a single item of PPI-VAS and Anxiety-VAS, the modified Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (MSF-MPQ), heart rate (HR), and mean arterial pressure (MAP). &nbsp; Massage was shown to have effective immediate, short-term (20 to 30 min), intermediate (1 to 2.5 hours), and long-term benefits (16 to 18 hours) on PPI and anxiety. The most significant impact on measures employed occurred 15 or 20 minutes after the intervention. There were no significant time effects in terms of decreases or increases in HR and MAP. Caution is suggested in the interpretation of study findings due to the convenience sampling, small sample size, and the quasi-experimental design employed. Importantly, this study demonstrated the feasibility of implementing a full-body MT and its acceptability to patients with bone pain. Massage resulted in subjective reports of relaxation, enhanced comfort, and less cancer-related pain and anxiety, and improved sleep. No patient reported any adverse effects as a result of the study procedures. Future studies are suggested for randomized clinical trials to validate the effectiveness of MT in this cancer population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:37:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:37:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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