The Effects of Cumulative Trauma on the Physical and Mental Health of Adolescents in Two Cultural Groups: African Americans and Iraqi Refugees

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152486
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Cumulative Trauma on the Physical and Mental Health of Adolescents in Two Cultural Groups: African Americans and Iraqi Refugees
Abstract:
The Effects of Cumulative Trauma on the Physical and Mental Health of Adolescents in Two Cultural Groups: African Americans and Iraqi Refugees
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Lewandowski, Linda A., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University/Children's Hospital of Michigan
Title:Associate Professor; Schotanus Professor of Pediatric Nursing
Co-Authors:Ibrahim Kira, PhD; Barbara Peterson; Rhonda L. Conner-Warren, MSN, RN, CPNP-PC; Lisa Chiodo, PhD
The notion of childhood as a time of blissful innocence is, unfortunately, not a reality for many children in the United Sates and around the world.  Many different groups of children and adolescents suffer cumulative trauma expereinces, i.e., multiple significant traumatic events and situations occurring repeatedly over time. Youth who experience psychological trauma frequently have subsequent health and functioning difficulties.  However, much of our current understanding of trauma is based on single event trauma that does not adequately represent the effects of cumulative trauma. The overall purpose of this project was to explore the cumulative effects of various types of violence exposure and trauma on adolescents' mental and physical health as well as interpersonal, cognitive, behavioral, and academic functioning.  The sample consisted of 390 adolescents, ages 11-16, from two different cultural groups with high violence/trauma risk: urban, low income African American teens who live in a high violence neighborhood in Detroit (N+180) and youth from Iraqi refugee families currently living in the U.S. (N=210). An innovative data collection method we termed "youth retreats" was used to collect data.  Four day-long sessions (2 days for African American and 2 days for Iraqi youth; approximately 100 youth each day) interspersed 5 hours of data collection with educational sessions (e.g., anti-drug, healthy eating), crafts, fun activities, a magic show, pizza, and prizes.  The teens were separated into 10 groups (5 groups of girls, 5 groups of boys) and rotated to five different stations throughout the day. Cultural modifications were made to respect each population. Data analysis is underway.  This presentation focused on the effects of cumulative trauma on the physical and mental health of the adolescents in these two cultural groups.  Implications for nurses in terms of assessment and intervention were discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Cumulative Trauma on the Physical and Mental Health of Adolescents in Two Cultural Groups: African Americans and Iraqi Refugeesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152486-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of Cumulative Trauma on the Physical and Mental Health of Adolescents in Two Cultural Groups: African Americans and Iraqi Refugees</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lewandowski, Linda A., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University/Children's Hospital of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor; Schotanus Professor of Pediatric Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">llewandowski@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ibrahim Kira, PhD; Barbara Peterson; Rhonda L. Conner-Warren, MSN, RN, CPNP-PC; Lisa Chiodo, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The notion of childhood as a time of blissful innocence is, unfortunately, not a reality for many children in the United Sates and around the world.&nbsp; Many different groups of children and adolescents suffer cumulative trauma expereinces, i.e., multiple significant traumatic events and situations occurring repeatedly over time.&nbsp;Youth who experience psychological trauma frequently have subsequent health and functioning difficulties.&nbsp; However, much of our current understanding of trauma is based on single event trauma that does not adequately represent the effects of cumulative trauma. The overall purpose of this project was to explore the cumulative effects of various types of violence exposure and trauma on adolescents' mental and physical health as well as interpersonal, cognitive, behavioral, and academic functioning.&nbsp; The sample consisted of 390 adolescents, ages 11-16, from two different cultural groups with high violence/trauma risk: urban, low income African American teens who live in a high violence neighborhood in Detroit (N+180) and youth from Iraqi refugee families currently living in the U.S. (N=210). An innovative data collection method we termed &quot;youth retreats&quot; was used to collect data.&nbsp; Four day-long sessions (2 days for African American and 2 days for Iraqi youth; approximately 100 youth each day) interspersed 5 hours of data collection with educational sessions (e.g., anti-drug, healthy eating), crafts, fun activities, a magic show, pizza, and prizes.&nbsp; The teens were separated into 10 groups (5 groups of girls, 5 groups of boys) and rotated to five different stations throughout the day. Cultural modifications were made to respect each population. Data analysis is underway.&nbsp; This presentation focused on the effects of cumulative trauma on the physical and mental health of the adolescents in these two cultural groups.&nbsp; Implications for nurses in terms of assessment and intervention were discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:38:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:38:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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