2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152518
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Conceptualize and Critique: Applying Research in Practice
Abstract:
Conceptualize and Critique: Applying Research in Practice
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 21, 2004
Author:Whiting, Tammy, RN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Maine Medical Center
One of the most common barriers or challenges expressed by staff nurses in applying research to practice is the ability to read and critique a published research article. Within the first step of the Clinical Scholar model, once a researchable clinical issue has been identified and the significance of the issue has been delineated, the nurse completes an online search of the relevant published research. When an article has been selected as appropriate to the clinical problem, a suggested format is used to reduce the "mystique" of the article and determine its scientific merit, level of evidence, and applicability to practice. At least two nurses critique each article and complete the Schultz Critique Table that is then used to prepare integrated tables. Nurses in the Children's Hospital were interested in using music as a distracter during unit-based procedures. Music therapy for reducing the pain of short painful procedures in children will be used as the context for this presentation. The presenter will explain the steps within the Clinical Scholar model for identifying and conceptualizing a researchable clinical problem and critiquing an article.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
21-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleConceptualize and Critique: Applying Research in Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152518-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Conceptualize and Critique: Applying Research in Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 21, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Whiting, Tammy, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Maine Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">whiting@Psouth.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">One of the most common barriers or challenges expressed by staff nurses in applying research to practice is the ability to read and critique a published research article. Within the first step of the Clinical Scholar model, once a researchable clinical issue has been identified and the significance of the issue has been delineated, the nurse completes an online search of the relevant published research. When an article has been selected as appropriate to the clinical problem, a suggested format is used to reduce the &quot;mystique&quot; of the article and determine its scientific merit, level of evidence, and applicability to practice. At least two nurses critique each article and complete the Schultz Critique Table that is then used to prepare integrated tables. Nurses in the Children's Hospital were interested in using music as a distracter during unit-based procedures. Music therapy for reducing the pain of short painful procedures in children will be used as the context for this presentation. The presenter will explain the steps within the Clinical Scholar model for identifying and conceptualizing a researchable clinical problem and critiquing an article.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:39:16Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-21en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:39:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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