2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152530
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Readability of American Academy of Pediatrics Patient Education Brochures
Abstract:
Readability of American Academy of Pediatrics Patient Education Brochures
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Freda, Margaret, EdD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Albert Einstein College of Medicine/Montefiore Medical Center
Title:Professor
Objective: To evaluate the readability of patient education brochures developed by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Design: Seventy-five patient education brochures were analyzed for readability using the Readability Calculator software. Two readability formulas reported frequently in the literature were chosen for report. Results: The mean readability level for all 75 brochures was grade 7.8 using the Flesch-Kincaid readability formula, and grade10.0 using the SMOG readability formula. When examined by decade of copyright or revision, the mean readability level for materials from the 1990's was grade 7.79 by Flesch-Kincaid and grade 9.93 by SMOG. For the documents from 2000-2004, the mean grade level was grade 7.9 by Flesch-Kincaid, and grade 10.2 by SMOG. When the SMOG formula was used, none of the brochures were of acceptably low (<8th grade) readability levels (range 8.3-12.7). Using the Flesch-Kincaid formula, 41 of the 75 brochures had acceptable readability levels( <8th grade). There was wide variability found between the formulas on all brochures. The SMOG formula routinely assessed the brochures 2-3 grade levels higher than the Flesch-Kincaid formula. Conclusions: Some of the AAP patient education brochures have acceptable levels of readability, but at least one-half are written at higher than acceptable readability levels for the general public. This study also demonstrated the value of using at least two different readability formulas when calculating readability of patient educational materials. In this study, had only the SMOG formula been used, all of the brochures would have been deemed unacceptable for readability level. Readability is an essential concept for patient education materials. It is recommended that professional associations which develop and market patient education materials test each for readability, and publish those readability levels on each piece of patient education so health care providers will know if the materials are appropriate for their patients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReadability of American Academy of Pediatrics Patient Education Brochuresen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152530-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Readability of American Academy of Pediatrics Patient Education Brochures</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Freda, Margaret, EdD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Albert Einstein College of Medicine/Montefiore Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">margaretfreda@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To evaluate the readability of patient education brochures developed by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Design: Seventy-five patient education brochures were analyzed for readability using the Readability Calculator software. Two readability formulas reported frequently in the literature were chosen for report. Results: The mean readability level for all 75 brochures was grade 7.8 using the Flesch-Kincaid readability formula, and grade10.0 using the SMOG readability formula. When examined by decade of copyright or revision, the mean readability level for materials from the 1990's was grade 7.79 by Flesch-Kincaid and grade 9.93 by SMOG. For the documents from 2000-2004, the mean grade level was grade 7.9 by Flesch-Kincaid, and grade 10.2 by SMOG. When the SMOG formula was used, none of the brochures were of acceptably low (&lt;8th grade) readability levels (range 8.3-12.7). Using the Flesch-Kincaid formula, 41 of the 75 brochures had acceptable readability levels( &lt;8th grade). There was wide variability found between the formulas on all brochures. The SMOG formula routinely assessed the brochures 2-3 grade levels higher than the Flesch-Kincaid formula. Conclusions: Some of the AAP patient education brochures have acceptable levels of readability, but at least one-half are written at higher than acceptable readability levels for the general public. This study also demonstrated the value of using at least two different readability formulas when calculating readability of patient educational materials. In this study, had only the SMOG formula been used, all of the brochures would have been deemed unacceptable for readability level. Readability is an essential concept for patient education materials. It is recommended that professional associations which develop and market patient education materials test each for readability, and publish those readability levels on each piece of patient education so health care providers will know if the materials are appropriate for their patients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:39:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:39:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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