2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152549
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Occupational Hazards Faced by Chinese Immigrants in the Restaurant Industry
Abstract:
Occupational Hazards Faced by Chinese Immigrants in the Restaurant Industry
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Tsai, Jenny Hsin-Chun, PhD, ARNP, CS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington School of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Mary K. Salazar, EdD, RN, COHN-S
Occupational hazards are known to be distributed differentially because of age, race, gender, language, literacy, culture, and low income (National Occupational Research Agenda, 1996). Although considerable efforts have been directed toward investigating disparities in physical health, comparatively, little attention has been given to looking at disparities in occupational hazards, injuries, and illnesses. The purpose of this presentation is to describe occupational hazards that Chinese immigrants encounter while working in restaurants. Data used for this presentation are drawn from an ongoing ethnographic study that examines occupational experiences of Chinese immigrants working in restaurants and factors influencing their experiences. An ecological framework is used to guide data collection and analysis. Immigrants who meet the following criteria are recruited from communities in the northwest region of the United States: (1) born in China, Hong Kong, or Taiwan, (2) at least 18 years old, (3) able to speak Mandarin Chinese, Taiwanese, or English, and (4) have had work experience in dining restaurants for at least 6 months. Data collection methods include in-depth interviews, participant-observations in local restaurants, and two paper-and-pencil questionnaires. Preliminary analysis of 12 interviews suggests that these restaurant workers commonly face chemical, biomechanical, physical, and psychosocial hazards. Psychosocial hazards (e.g., hierarchical work relationships, pace at work) were mentioned by all participants. Physical hazards (e.g., heat, ventilation, hot oil) were often brought up by cooking helpers or cooks. Chemical (e.g., cleaning solutions) and biomechanical hazards (e.g., lifting heavy loads of dishes, slippery floor) were usually revealed in dishwashers' interviews. Literature has showed that immigrant workers have higher rates of occupational accidents than native workers in their receiving country (Dembe 1999). Findings of this study will enhance nurses' knowledge about the kinds of occupational hazards that restaurant workers may face and guide the development of strategies to decrease disparities in occupational injuries and illnesses.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOccupational Hazards Faced by Chinese Immigrants in the Restaurant Industryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152549-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Occupational Hazards Faced by Chinese Immigrants in the Restaurant Industry</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tsai, Jenny Hsin-Chun, PhD, ARNP, CS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jennyt@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary K. Salazar, EdD, RN, COHN-S</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Occupational hazards are known to be distributed differentially because of age, race, gender, language, literacy, culture, and low income (National Occupational Research Agenda, 1996). Although considerable efforts have been directed toward investigating disparities in physical health, comparatively, little attention has been given to looking at disparities in occupational hazards, injuries, and illnesses. The purpose of this presentation is to describe occupational hazards that Chinese immigrants encounter while working in restaurants. Data used for this presentation are drawn from an ongoing ethnographic study that examines occupational experiences of Chinese immigrants working in restaurants and factors influencing their experiences. An ecological framework is used to guide data collection and analysis. Immigrants who meet the following criteria are recruited from communities in the northwest region of the United States: (1) born in China, Hong Kong, or Taiwan, (2) at least 18 years old, (3) able to speak Mandarin Chinese, Taiwanese, or English, and (4) have had work experience in dining restaurants for at least 6 months. Data collection methods include in-depth interviews, participant-observations in local restaurants, and two paper-and-pencil questionnaires. Preliminary analysis of 12 interviews suggests that these restaurant workers commonly face chemical, biomechanical, physical, and psychosocial hazards. Psychosocial hazards (e.g., hierarchical work relationships, pace at work) were mentioned by all participants. Physical hazards (e.g., heat, ventilation, hot oil) were often brought up by cooking helpers or cooks. Chemical (e.g., cleaning solutions) and biomechanical hazards (e.g., lifting heavy loads of dishes, slippery floor) were usually revealed in dishwashers' interviews. Literature has showed that immigrant workers have higher rates of occupational accidents than native workers in their receiving country (Dembe 1999). Findings of this study will enhance nurses' knowledge about the kinds of occupational hazards that restaurant workers may face and guide the development of strategies to decrease disparities in occupational injuries and illnesses.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:40:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:40:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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