Cardiovascular Stress Responses of African American Caregivers During Sleep: Methodological Issues and Future Directions

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152552
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cardiovascular Stress Responses of African American Caregivers During Sleep: Methodological Issues and Future Directions
Abstract:
Cardiovascular Stress Responses of African American Caregivers During Sleep: Methodological Issues and Future Directions
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Picot, Sandra J. F., PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Maryland, Baltimore
Title:Associate Professor, Gershowitz Endowed Chair
Co-Authors:Erika Friedmann, PhD; Sue A. Thomas, PhD, RN, FAAN
BACKGROUND: Caring for a disabled elder can be stressful. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) during sleep hold promise as stress indicators. During sleep, the influences of posture and activity are minimized, facilitating evaluation of the influence of caregiver status and perceived stress on BP and HR. DESIGN: Case-control design of caregivers and noncaregivers. POPULATION, SAMPLE, SETTING, YEARS: Random sample of African American (AA) women (age 18+) who were caregivers for disabled older (65+) adults (n=193) and AA women living in the community who were potential caregivers (n=179) in their homes. Variables studied: sleep BP, HR, caregiver status, perceived stress, covariates (age, body mass index, alcohol, hypertension treatment, smoking, exercise). Methods: After informed consent, nurses interviewed, and attached the ambulatory BP monitor to participants. BP and HR were recorded every 60 minutes 10PM to 6AM (sleep BP). Participants recorded bed and awakening times and nighttime activity. Separate hierarchical linear regressions entering caregiver status, perception of stress, and their interaction in the first block; potential covariates in the second block for each outcome: mean systolic BP, diastolic BP, and HR. FINDINGS: Caregiver status, perceived stress, and their interaction did not explain SBP or DBP during sleep. Covariates explained 23% of SBP (p<.05) and 9% of DBP (p<.05) variances. For HR, perceived stress contributed 1.4% (p<.05); covariates added 8.6% (p<.05). CONCLUSIONS/METHODOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS: Cardiovascular stress responses of AA caregivers and noncaregivers do not differ during sleep, contrary to findings of higher awake BPs among Caucasian caregivers. Perceived stress explained HR, caregiver status did not. Other factors may explain the different relationships of these variables to cardiovascular status in AA and Caucasian women. Future studies of caregiver stress would benefit from attention to SAMPLE (homogeneous caregiver group), ENVIRONMENT (posture, location, activity), MEASUREMENT (operationalzing caregiver status and stress responses) and DATA ANALYSIS (incorporating moderators).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCardiovascular Stress Responses of African American Caregivers During Sleep: Methodological Issues and Future Directionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152552-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cardiovascular Stress Responses of African American Caregivers During Sleep: Methodological Issues and Future Directions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Picot, Sandra J. F., PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Maryland, Baltimore</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor, Gershowitz Endowed Chair</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">picot@son.umaryland.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Erika Friedmann, PhD; Sue A. Thomas, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">BACKGROUND: Caring for a disabled elder can be stressful. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) during sleep hold promise as stress indicators. During sleep, the influences of posture and activity are minimized, facilitating evaluation of the influence of caregiver status and perceived stress on BP and HR. DESIGN: Case-control design of caregivers and noncaregivers. POPULATION, SAMPLE, SETTING, YEARS: Random sample of African American (AA) women (age 18+) who were caregivers for disabled older (65+) adults (n=193) and AA women living in the community who were potential caregivers (n=179) in their homes. Variables studied: sleep BP, HR, caregiver status, perceived stress, covariates (age, body mass index, alcohol, hypertension treatment, smoking, exercise). Methods: After informed consent, nurses interviewed, and attached the ambulatory BP monitor to participants. BP and HR were recorded every 60 minutes 10PM to 6AM (sleep BP). Participants recorded bed and awakening times and nighttime activity. Separate hierarchical linear regressions entering caregiver status, perception of stress, and their interaction in the first block; potential covariates in the second block for each outcome: mean systolic BP, diastolic BP, and HR. FINDINGS: Caregiver status, perceived stress, and their interaction did not explain SBP or DBP during sleep. Covariates explained 23% of SBP (p&lt;.05) and 9% of DBP (p&lt;.05) variances. For HR, perceived stress contributed 1.4% (p&lt;.05); covariates added 8.6% (p&lt;.05). CONCLUSIONS/METHODOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS: Cardiovascular stress responses of AA caregivers and noncaregivers do not differ during sleep, contrary to findings of higher awake BPs among Caucasian caregivers. Perceived stress explained HR, caregiver status did not. Other factors may explain the different relationships of these variables to cardiovascular status in AA and Caucasian women. Future studies of caregiver stress would benefit from attention to SAMPLE (homogeneous caregiver group), ENVIRONMENT (posture, location, activity), MEASUREMENT (operationalzing caregiver status and stress responses) and DATA ANALYSIS (incorporating moderators).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:40:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:40:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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