Perceived Difficulty and Preparation for Caregiving Activities in Caregivers of Persons With Memory Problems

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152560
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceived Difficulty and Preparation for Caregiving Activities in Caregivers of Persons With Memory Problems
Abstract:
Perceived Difficulty and Preparation for Caregiving Activities in Caregivers of Persons With Memory Problems
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Ellison, Kathy Jo, RN, DSN, CIP
P.I. Institution Name:Auburn University
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Arlene H. Morris, RN, MSN
As the US population ages over the coming years, the number of people with memory-related problems is expected to increase dramatically. It is critical that these individuals and their caregivers have access to early and continued education and support in order to meet their needs. The purpose of this paper is to describe the involvement, perceived difficulty and preparation for caregiving in caregivers of persons with memory problems attending a memory and healthy aging center and discuss the results of an individualized educational support program. A pre-post survey approach was utilized with those attending a memory and healthy aging center operating in two cities in Alabama. Questionnaire data were collected regarding caregiver involvement with physical care, behavioral and psychological symptoms of memory problems as well as life changes that have been made. Caregivers were asked to rate their perceived difficulty with providing the care and preparation for making the changes needed both pre and post the intervention program. Sixty-five people participated varying from those providing care early in the course of a memory problem and looking for something to delay the progress of the disease to those proving a high degree of physical and mental care and nearing burnout. Over 90% of the participants had one or more areas where perceived difficulty was high. General life and role changes were difficult for most all of the caregivers and physical care needs, when present, seem to generate feelings of least preparation. Caregivers were often not aware of strategies to deal with care recipient psychosocial needs and problem behaviors. The majority of caregivers reported a significant improvement in their stress and feelings of preparation post program. Implications for education and support of caregivers of those with memory problems and recommendations for future research to improve caregiving outcomes will be addressed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceived Difficulty and Preparation for Caregiving Activities in Caregivers of Persons With Memory Problemsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152560-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perceived Difficulty and Preparation for Caregiving Activities in Caregivers of Persons With Memory Problems</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ellison, Kathy Jo, RN, DSN, CIP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Auburn University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">elliskj@auburn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Arlene H. Morris, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">As the US population ages over the coming years, the number of people with memory-related problems is expected to increase dramatically. It is critical that these individuals and their caregivers have access to early and continued education and support in order to meet their needs. The purpose of this paper is to describe the involvement, perceived difficulty and preparation for caregiving in caregivers of persons with memory problems attending a memory and healthy aging center and discuss the results of an individualized educational support program. A pre-post survey approach was utilized with those attending a memory and healthy aging center operating in two cities in Alabama. Questionnaire data were collected regarding caregiver involvement with physical care, behavioral and psychological symptoms of memory problems as well as life changes that have been made. Caregivers were asked to rate their perceived difficulty with providing the care and preparation for making the changes needed both pre and post the intervention program. Sixty-five people participated varying from those providing care early in the course of a memory problem and looking for something to delay the progress of the disease to those proving a high degree of physical and mental care and nearing burnout. Over 90% of the participants had one or more areas where perceived difficulty was high. General life and role changes were difficult for most all of the caregivers and physical care needs, when present, seem to generate feelings of least preparation. Caregivers were often not aware of strategies to deal with care recipient psychosocial needs and problem behaviors. The majority of caregivers reported a significant improvement in their stress and feelings of preparation post program. Implications for education and support of caregivers of those with memory problems and recommendations for future research to improve caregiving outcomes will be addressed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:40:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:40:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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