An Evidence-Based, Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention for the Treatment of Obesity in Schizophrenia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152563
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Evidence-Based, Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention for the Treatment of Obesity in Schizophrenia
Abstract:
An Evidence-Based, Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention for the Treatment of Obesity in Schizophrenia
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Weber, Mary, PhD, APRN, BC, PMHNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas At Arlington
Title:Assistant Professor
Type 2 Diabetes and Obesity are now significant co-morbid diseases for individuals with schizophrenia, who also have additional risk factors of smoking, a sedentary lifestyle, and poor eating habits. The best drug treatments for schizophrenia, the atypical antipsychotic medications, create more weight gain and exacerbate already existing weight problems. Results from risk reduction studies in the fields of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease support the use of cognitive-behavioral techniques to promote motivation and provide strategies to overcome the barriers in adherence to diet and activity modification. The Diabetes Prevention Project (DPP) was a landmark multi-center clinical trial that demonstrated that a 16-week Cognitive Behavioral (CB) intervention significantly reduced the incidence of diabetes. Our study tested the efficacy of a 16-week (CB) group intervention, modified from the DPP program, in reducing body weight among a sample of individuals with schizophrenia who were taking atypical antipsychotic medication. Seventeen subjects were randomly assigned to the group intervention or treatment as usual (TAU). Weight, body mass index, and waist-hip circumference were measured. Subjects in the treatment arm lost weight compared to the TAU group. Additional studies are planned to focus specifically on Hispanic and African American females with schizophrenia.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Evidence-Based, Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention for the Treatment of Obesity in Schizophreniaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152563-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Evidence-Based, Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention for the Treatment of Obesity in Schizophrenia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Weber, Mary, PhD, APRN, BC, PMHNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas At Arlington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mweber@uta.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Type 2 Diabetes and Obesity are now significant co-morbid diseases for individuals with schizophrenia, who also have additional risk factors of smoking, a sedentary lifestyle, and poor eating habits. The best drug treatments for schizophrenia, the atypical antipsychotic medications, create more weight gain and exacerbate already existing weight problems. Results from risk reduction studies in the fields of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease support the use of cognitive-behavioral techniques to promote motivation and provide strategies to overcome the barriers in adherence to diet and activity modification. The Diabetes Prevention Project (DPP) was a landmark multi-center clinical trial that demonstrated that a 16-week Cognitive Behavioral (CB) intervention significantly reduced the incidence of diabetes. Our study tested the efficacy of a 16-week (CB) group intervention, modified from the DPP program, in reducing body weight among a sample of individuals with schizophrenia who were taking atypical antipsychotic medication. Seventeen subjects were randomly assigned to the group intervention or treatment as usual (TAU). Weight, body mass index, and waist-hip circumference were measured. Subjects in the treatment arm lost weight compared to the TAU group. Additional studies are planned to focus specifically on Hispanic and African American females with schizophrenia.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:40:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:40:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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