HIV Occupational Exposure and Emergency Response Employees: The Need for Education

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152568
Type:
Presentation
Title:
HIV Occupational Exposure and Emergency Response Employees: The Need for Education
Abstract:
HIV Occupational Exposure and Emergency Response Employees: The Need for Education
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Stevens, Lyn, ACRN, MS, NP
P.I. Institution Name:SUNY Upstate Medical University
Title:HIV training coordinator
Co-Authors:Adele A. Webb, PhD, RN, ACRN, FNAP, FAAN
In many states there is new legislation related to confidentiality, release of information and protocols for treatment for accidental HIV occupational exposure. This study examined the self-reports of both hospital infection control nurses and emergency response employees in regards to education about rights and responsibilities of patients, institutions and individuals. Surveys were sent to seventy institutions and emergency response employees in the mid west area. Over forty-seven percent of the surveys were returned. Findings indicated that there is an overwhelming need for education at all levels related to this topic. In addition, there is a dire need for clarification of rules and regulations (many that vary state to state). Both nursing and patient implications related to this research are vast. Not only are host patients rights not being protected, the rights to treatment and information of the injured person are being violated. Infection Control nurses and ERE's alike must be educated as to the importance of rapid response and access to information so that HIV prophylaxis can be started while it still has a chance of preventing infection in those with accidental occupational exposure.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHIV Occupational Exposure and Emergency Response Employees: The Need for Educationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152568-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">HIV Occupational Exposure and Emergency Response Employees: The Need for Education</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stevens, Lyn, ACRN, MS, NP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">SUNY Upstate Medical University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">HIV training coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">StevensL@upstate.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Adele A. Webb, PhD, RN, ACRN, FNAP, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In many states there is new legislation related to confidentiality, release of information and protocols for treatment for accidental HIV occupational exposure. This study examined the self-reports of both hospital infection control nurses and emergency response employees in regards to education about rights and responsibilities of patients, institutions and individuals. Surveys were sent to seventy institutions and emergency response employees in the mid west area. Over forty-seven percent of the surveys were returned. Findings indicated that there is an overwhelming need for education at all levels related to this topic. In addition, there is a dire need for clarification of rules and regulations (many that vary state to state). Both nursing and patient implications related to this research are vast. Not only are host patients rights not being protected, the rights to treatment and information of the injured person are being violated. Infection Control nurses and ERE's alike must be educated as to the importance of rapid response and access to information so that HIV prophylaxis can be started while it still has a chance of preventing infection in those with accidental occupational exposure.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:41:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:41:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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