2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152569
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Concept of Marginalization: Analysis & Development
Abstract:
The Concept of Marginalization: Analysis & Development
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Vasas, Elyssa Beth, MPH, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing
Title:Pre-Doctoral Fellow International Center for Women and ChildrenÆs HealthUniversity of Pennsylvania School of Nursing
Background: ôMarginalizedö is a term used to describe a vast number of people, experiences, and events in social science literature. Rarely, however, is the phenomenon of ôbeing marginalizedö or ôexperiencing marginalizationö described. The specific aims of this paper are to explore the concept of social marginalization for the purposes of concept development, with the goal of generating knowledge about working with socially marginalized people. A secondary aim is to explore whether marginalization remains a useful concept in nursing. Methods: Concept development evolved from the critical analysis of relevant literature. Key word searches were performed in CINHAL«, PubMed«, and social science databases outside of nursing, with no limitations on year of publication. The 55 books and articles included for review represent a 70 year span, and describe or refer directly to the process or experience of marginalization or its parallel concept, social exclusion. Literature was organized thematically and included themes contribute to concept development. Findings: This analysis resulted in further development of the concept of marginalization through the addition of three new properties. These include: 1. Marginalization is both a process and an experience 2. Marginalization occurs on global, community, and individual levels û and that the process, experience, and consequences of marginalization vary greatly at each level 3. Marginalization frequently occurs at intersections where sources of marginalization overlap. The concept of marginalization can provide nurses with innovative approaches to thinking about research, education, and practice in a way that helps them explore how social inequities affect health. Therefore, the concept of marginalization continues to have great relevance to the discipline of nursing, particularly with the current focus on reducing health disparities and working with vulnerable populations. This paper explores the challenges of using marginalization as an independent concept and suggests areas for future inquiry.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Concept of Marginalization: Analysis & Developmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152569-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Concept of Marginalization: Analysis &amp; Development</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Vasas, Elyssa Beth, MPH, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Pre-Doctoral Fellow International Center for Women and Children&AElig;s HealthUniversity of Pennsylvania School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">evasas@nursing.upenn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: &ocirc;Marginalized&ouml; is a term used to describe a vast number of people, experiences, and events in social science literature. Rarely, however, is the phenomenon of &ocirc;being marginalized&ouml; or &ocirc;experiencing marginalization&ouml; described. The specific aims of this paper are to explore the concept of social marginalization for the purposes of concept development, with the goal of generating knowledge about working with socially marginalized people. A secondary aim is to explore whether marginalization remains a useful concept in nursing. Methods: Concept development evolved from the critical analysis of relevant literature. Key word searches were performed in CINHAL&laquo;, PubMed&laquo;, and social science databases outside of nursing, with no limitations on year of publication. The 55 books and articles included for review represent a 70 year span, and describe or refer directly to the process or experience of marginalization or its parallel concept, social exclusion. Literature was organized thematically and included themes contribute to concept development. Findings: This analysis resulted in further development of the concept of marginalization through the addition of three new properties. These include: 1. Marginalization is both a process and an experience 2. Marginalization occurs on global, community, and individual levels &ucirc; and that the process, experience, and consequences of marginalization vary greatly at each level 3. Marginalization frequently occurs at intersections where sources of marginalization overlap. The concept of marginalization can provide nurses with innovative approaches to thinking about research, education, and practice in a way that helps them explore how social inequities affect health. Therefore, the concept of marginalization continues to have great relevance to the discipline of nursing, particularly with the current focus on reducing health disparities and working with vulnerable populations. This paper explores the challenges of using marginalization as an independent concept and suggests areas for future inquiry.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:41:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:41:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.