Exit Monodisciplinary Nursing Terms and Classifications? The Use of the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health Explored

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152570
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exit Monodisciplinary Nursing Terms and Classifications? The Use of the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health Explored
Abstract:
Exit Monodisciplinary Nursing Terms and Classifications? The Use of the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health Explored
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Van Achterberg, Theo, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center
Co-Authors:Gerda Holleman, MSc, RN; Yvonne Heijnen-Kaales, MSc, RN; Hillegonda A. Stallinga, MSc, RN; Ype Meinte Van der Brug, MSc, RN; Gabriel Roodbol, MA, RN
BACKGROUND - Deciding on terminology and classifications should precede health informatics initiatives. Preferably, terms and classifications of choice support the exchange of information between disciplines. The multidisciplinary International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) was developed by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and has a history of more than 20 years. Yet, nurses have rarely used the classification and put great effort in the development of monodisciplinary nursing classifications. AIM - This presentation reports on a study that systematically explored the usefulness of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health in nursing practice. METHODS û Nursing practice applications (e.g. assessment forms, transfer forms, care plans etc.) based on the ICF were developed in 10 sub-projects in three university medical centres. The study used information from 653 patients, 469 nurses and 178 others (ICF experts & other professionals). The study specifically described which parts of the classifications were used in nursing applications and which terms should be altered or added to improve the ICF's relevance for the nursing discipline. FINDINGS - All ICF components and all domains within these components were used in the applications. A set of 42 commonly used terms could be identified. The use of three-digit codes (a level of moderate detail) in the applications revealed a predominant focus on the ICF component of æbody functions' (53% of all three-digit codes for this components were used). Some items that could be added, improved or described with more detail were identified. CONCLUSIONS - The ICF can be a useful tool in classifying and communicating aspects of patient functioning. A level of moderate detail (three-digit level) seems appropriate for most nursing purposes. Our results on items that could be added or improved can serve as input in future revisions of the classification. Use of the ICF in health informatics initiatives should be encouraged.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExit Monodisciplinary Nursing Terms and Classifications? The Use of the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health Exploreden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152570-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Exit Monodisciplinary Nursing Terms and Classifications? The Use of the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health Explored</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Van Achterberg, Theo, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">t.vanachterberg@wok.umcn.nl</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Gerda Holleman, MSc, RN; Yvonne Heijnen-Kaales, MSc, RN; Hillegonda A. Stallinga, MSc, RN; Ype Meinte Van der Brug, MSc, RN; Gabriel Roodbol, MA, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">BACKGROUND - Deciding on terminology and classifications should precede health informatics initiatives. Preferably, terms and classifications of choice support the exchange of information between disciplines. The multidisciplinary International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) was developed by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and has a history of more than 20 years. Yet, nurses have rarely used the classification and put great effort in the development of monodisciplinary nursing classifications. AIM - This presentation reports on a study that systematically explored the usefulness of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health in nursing practice. METHODS &ucirc; Nursing practice applications (e.g. assessment forms, transfer forms, care plans etc.) based on the ICF were developed in 10 sub-projects in three university medical centres. The study used information from 653 patients, 469 nurses and 178 others (ICF experts &amp; other professionals). The study specifically described which parts of the classifications were used in nursing applications and which terms should be altered or added to improve the ICF's relevance for the nursing discipline. FINDINGS - All ICF components and all domains within these components were used in the applications. A set of 42 commonly used terms could be identified. The use of three-digit codes (a level of moderate detail) in the applications revealed a predominant focus on the ICF component of &aelig;body functions' (53% of all three-digit codes for this components were used). Some items that could be added, improved or described with more detail were identified. CONCLUSIONS - The ICF can be a useful tool in classifying and communicating aspects of patient functioning. A level of moderate detail (three-digit level) seems appropriate for most nursing purposes. Our results on items that could be added or improved can serve as input in future revisions of the classification. Use of the ICF in health informatics initiatives should be encouraged.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:41:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:41:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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