2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152594
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurse-Physician Collaboration Using a Pediatric Simulator
Abstract:
Nurse-Physician Collaboration Using a Pediatric Simulator
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Messmer, Patricia R., PhD, RN, BC, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Miami Children's Hospital
Title:Nurse Researcher
Co-Authors:Susana Barroso, RN, BSN; Jacqueline Gonzalez, ARNP, MSN, CNAA, BC
Nurse-physician (N-P) relationships are important component of ANCC Magnet. N-P influenced costs and patient care effectiveness in AACN (Knaus, 2001). Human patient simulator (HPS) studies focus on medical residents, anesthesia and nursing students (Rogers, 2001; Schwid, 2002). Bruce (2003) evaluated ARNP's on knowledge and clinical performance. HPS benefits- increased learning, retention and confidence outweighed expense and time (Morton & Rowne, 2004). HPS provided state-of-art interactive learning knowledge, critical thinking, communication and teamwork (Nehring & Lashley, 2004). Little documentation if collaborative NP teams lead to effective outcomes. Purpose: Assess NP collaboration using HPS ôPediatric Patient Pamö. Conceptual Framework: King's (1981) time/perception concepts. Methodology: Research #1: What is NP collaboration level using Kramer/Schmalenberg's (2002) NP Likert 1-5 Scale (KSNPS), NACHRI Group Cohesion 1-7 (GC) and Collaboration & Satisfaction about Care Decisions 1-7(CSCD) instruments. Research #2: What is relationship between KSNPS, GC, CSCD and HPS competency? Research design-descriptive, exploratory study. Results: 18 teams- 48 nurses and 54 medical residents at SE children's hospital. ôTeamsö 3 residents/3 nurses in 3 ômock codeö scenarios. Scenarios videotaped; debriefing sessions. Findings. Mode age (28-32), 48% Hispanic, 62% female. GC Productivity & Efficiency-average; Morale & Belongingness above average; Personal feelings-ôlike very muchö; Working together-ôenjoy it.ö. CSCD ôagree very muchö indicating high collaboration/satisfaction levels. KSNPS level increased per scenario. 1st scenario category neutral (4); 2nd student-teacher (3); 3rd Collaboration (2). Although teams PERCEIVED collaboration, it evolved over TIME with no significant correlation between KSNPS, GC, CSCD & HPS scores. Males-higher GC and CSCD scores than females (F=4.94, p=0.29; F=8.35, p=.005) Discussion: 1st scenario residents communicated with each other; nurses-to-nurses; 2nd nurse/residents communicated, evolving into ôworkingö team; 3rd team more cohesive, communicated more effectively and genuinely listened to each other, regardless of rank. Conclusions: Participants responded during "coding" with improved knowledge, assessment and collaboration, saving ôPatient Pamö.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurse-Physician Collaboration Using a Pediatric Simulatoren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152594-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurse-Physician Collaboration Using a Pediatric Simulator</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Messmer, Patricia R., PhD, RN, BC, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Miami Children's Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Researcher</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">patricia.messmer@mch.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susana Barroso, RN, BSN; Jacqueline Gonzalez, ARNP, MSN, CNAA, BC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nurse-physician (N-P) relationships are important component of ANCC Magnet. N-P influenced costs and patient care effectiveness in AACN (Knaus, 2001). Human patient simulator (HPS) studies focus on medical residents, anesthesia and nursing students (Rogers, 2001; Schwid, 2002). Bruce (2003) evaluated ARNP's on knowledge and clinical performance. HPS benefits- increased learning, retention and confidence outweighed expense and time (Morton &amp; Rowne, 2004). HPS provided state-of-art interactive learning knowledge, critical thinking, communication and teamwork (Nehring &amp; Lashley, 2004). Little documentation if collaborative NP teams lead to effective outcomes. Purpose: Assess NP collaboration using HPS &ocirc;Pediatric Patient Pam&ouml;. Conceptual Framework: King's (1981) time/perception concepts. Methodology: Research #1: What is NP collaboration level using Kramer/Schmalenberg's (2002) NP Likert 1-5 Scale (KSNPS), NACHRI Group Cohesion 1-7 (GC) and Collaboration &amp; Satisfaction about Care Decisions 1-7(CSCD) instruments. Research #2: What is relationship between KSNPS, GC, CSCD and HPS competency? Research design-descriptive, exploratory study. Results: 18 teams- 48 nurses and 54 medical residents at SE children's hospital. &ocirc;Teams&ouml; 3 residents/3 nurses in 3 &ocirc;mock code&ouml; scenarios. Scenarios videotaped; debriefing sessions. Findings. Mode age (28-32), 48% Hispanic, 62% female. GC Productivity &amp; Efficiency-average; Morale &amp; Belongingness above average; Personal feelings-&ocirc;like very much&ouml;; Working together-&ocirc;enjoy it.&ouml;. CSCD &ocirc;agree very much&ouml; indicating high collaboration/satisfaction levels. KSNPS level increased per scenario. 1st scenario category neutral (4); 2nd student-teacher (3); 3rd Collaboration (2). Although teams PERCEIVED collaboration, it evolved over TIME with no significant correlation between KSNPS, GC, CSCD &amp; HPS scores. Males-higher GC and CSCD scores than females (F=4.94, p=0.29; F=8.35, p=.005) Discussion: 1st scenario residents communicated with each other; nurses-to-nurses; 2nd nurse/residents communicated, evolving into &ocirc;working&ouml; team; 3rd team more cohesive, communicated more effectively and genuinely listened to each other, regardless of rank. Conclusions: Participants responded during &quot;coding&quot; with improved knowledge, assessment and collaboration, saving &ocirc;Patient Pam&ouml;.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:42:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:42:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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