2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152596
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Symbolic Interactionist Study of Nursing Morale
Abstract:
A Symbolic Interactionist Study of Nursing Morale
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Windsor, Carol Anne, BA, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Queensland University of Technology
Title:MS
Co-Authors:Gary E. Day, RN, EM, DipAppSc, BN, MHM, AFCHSE, CHE; Alice Wu, BB
There is an essential contradiction underlying nursing where, despite the achievements of the last twenty years,low morale pervades the profession. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of registered nurses and how those experiences construct morale. The objectives were twofold: first, to generate an understanding of nursing morale within a rapidly changing working context and second, to further our methodological and theoretical understandings of the concept of nursing morale. In this symbolic interactionist study, in-depth interviews were conducted with seven registered nurses who were working in south east Queensland and undertaking postgraduate university studies. A grounded theory method of analysis was applied to the research data. What emerged from the analysis was a conceptualisation of the key category: the struggle to care. This category describes a fundamental tension between the professional claims of nursing and the realities of the nursing workplace. The analysis seeks to explicate the ways in which this tension manifests within the workplace, institutional and social dimensions of nursing work. The findings challenge prevailing management models that seek to address staff development and staff morale. The key implication is that nursing morale is at once a contextual and broader social issue.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Symbolic Interactionist Study of Nursing Moraleen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152596-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Symbolic Interactionist Study of Nursing Morale</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Windsor, Carol Anne, BA, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Queensland University of Technology</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">MS</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">c.windsor@qut.edu.au</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Gary E. Day, RN, EM, DipAppSc, BN, MHM, AFCHSE, CHE; Alice Wu, BB</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">There is an essential contradiction underlying nursing where, despite the achievements of the last twenty years,low morale pervades the profession. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of registered nurses and how those experiences construct morale. The objectives were twofold: first, to generate an understanding of nursing morale within a rapidly changing working context and second, to further our methodological and theoretical understandings of the concept of nursing morale. In this symbolic interactionist study, in-depth interviews were conducted with seven registered nurses who were working in south east Queensland and undertaking postgraduate university studies. A grounded theory method of analysis was applied to the research data. What emerged from the analysis was a conceptualisation of the key category: the struggle to care. This category describes a fundamental tension between the professional claims of nursing and the realities of the nursing workplace. The analysis seeks to explicate the ways in which this tension manifests within the workplace, institutional and social dimensions of nursing work. The findings challenge prevailing management models that seek to address staff development and staff morale. The key implication is that nursing morale is at once a contextual and broader social issue.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:42:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:42:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.