The Influence of Psychosocial Factors With the Incidence and Prevalence of Work-Related Injury and Illness in Registered Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152605
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Influence of Psychosocial Factors With the Incidence and Prevalence of Work-Related Injury and Illness in Registered Nurses
Abstract:
The Influence of Psychosocial Factors With the Incidence and Prevalence of Work-Related Injury and Illness in Registered Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Duke, Gloria, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Texas at Tyler
Title:Associate Professor, Assistant Dean for Research and Outreach
Co-Authors:Anne DeWitt, MSN, RN; Helen Miner, PhD, RN; Paul Rountree, MD; William Sorensen, PhD
TThe critical nursing shortage that is being experienced within the United States is expected to intensify as current nurses in the workforce age and as the need for health care grows. In addition to an aging RN workforce, dissatisfaction with nursing has been cited as a reason for leaving the profession. Psychosocial and workplace environmental stress factors have been reported to influence illness and injury in RNs. These factors included requirements for long hours, heavy lifting, low staffing levels, a perceived lack of support from peers and management, and concerns about injustice and unfair practices. Musculoskeletal injuries, particularly from lifting activities, are common problems for health care workers. Data suggests that overexertion injuries to health care workers are double the rates occurring in general industry. The purpose of this descriptive, correlational study is to examine the influence of psychosocial factors and demographic data with the incidence and prevalence of work-related injury and illness in Registered Nurses who work in acute care, long term care, and community (home health) settings. The sample size will be approximately 350 RNs working at least 20 hours per week. The Job Content Questionnaire is being used to measure psychosocial factors of the work environment, and the Questionnaire on the Experience and Assessment of Work is being used to measure role ambiguity, interpersonal work-related conflicts, emotional demands, and job insecurity. Data will be entered into SPSS, Version 11.0 and descriptive, correlational statistics used. If psychosocial factors are demonstrated to directly influence job satisfaction and/or work-related injury and illness, then predictive level studies may be directed toward minimizing/eliminating those factors that contribute to negative nurse retention. A healthier work environment may contribute to nursing recruitment and retention, positively impacting the acute and projected nursing shortage, and consequently assuring better care for health care consumers of the future.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Influence of Psychosocial Factors With the Incidence and Prevalence of Work-Related Injury and Illness in Registered Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152605-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Influence of Psychosocial Factors With the Incidence and Prevalence of Work-Related Injury and Illness in Registered Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Duke, Gloria, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Texas at Tyler</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor, Assistant Dean for Research and Outreach</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gduke@mail.uttyl.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Anne DeWitt, MSN, RN; Helen Miner, PhD, RN; Paul Rountree, MD; William Sorensen, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">TThe critical nursing shortage that is being experienced within the United States is expected to intensify as current nurses in the workforce age and as the need for health care grows. In addition to an aging RN workforce, dissatisfaction with nursing has been cited as a reason for leaving the profession. Psychosocial and workplace environmental stress factors have been reported to influence illness and injury in RNs. These factors included requirements for long hours, heavy lifting, low staffing levels, a perceived lack of support from peers and management, and concerns about injustice and unfair practices. Musculoskeletal injuries, particularly from lifting activities, are common problems for health care workers. Data suggests that overexertion injuries to health care workers are double the rates occurring in general industry. The purpose of this descriptive, correlational study is to examine the influence of psychosocial factors and demographic data with the incidence and prevalence of work-related injury and illness in Registered Nurses who work in acute care, long term care, and community (home health) settings. The sample size will be approximately 350 RNs working at least 20 hours per week. The Job Content Questionnaire is being used to measure psychosocial factors of the work environment, and the Questionnaire on the Experience and Assessment of Work is being used to measure role ambiguity, interpersonal work-related conflicts, emotional demands, and job insecurity. Data will be entered into SPSS, Version 11.0 and descriptive, correlational statistics used. If psychosocial factors are demonstrated to directly influence job satisfaction and/or work-related injury and illness, then predictive level studies may be directed toward minimizing/eliminating those factors that contribute to negative nurse retention. A healthier work environment may contribute to nursing recruitment and retention, positively impacting the acute and projected nursing shortage, and consequently assuring better care for health care consumers of the future.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:42:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:42:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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