A Model of Demands on Nursing Staff Related to Caring, Families, and Physicians

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152614
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Model of Demands on Nursing Staff Related to Caring, Families, and Physicians
Abstract:
A Model of Demands on Nursing Staff Related to Caring, Families, and Physicians
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Houser, Janet, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Regis University
Title:A Model of Demands on Nursing Staff Related to Caring, Families, and Physicians
Co-Authors:Rita Axford, PhD, RN; Lynn Wimett, EdD, RN
Determining nurse workload is essential for appropriate resource allocation. Traditional workload assessments focus on quantifying tasks and assume that all value of nursing can be observed, timed, and counted. Such methods underestimate the complexity of professional nursing and are often unreliable. This research is the second in a series aimed at developing a comprehensive, population-based workload measurement tool. Previous research developed a model of environmental demands. The purpose of this specific study was to develop a model that describes the demands on nursing time that are driven by patients' caring needs, families, and physicians. This study used focus group methodologies with 14 groups in 6 hospitals and interview data from 96 registered nurses. Nurses represented acute inpatient, children's, and rehabilitation nursing in not-for-profit, for-profit, and teaching hospitals. Validity and reliability were addressed through member-checks, coding audits, inter-rater agreement calculations (using Cohen's Kappa) and interviews exploring contradictory and inconclusive responses. Adequate sample size was confirmed by achievement of saturation. Constant-comparison analytic methods were applied. Analysis resulted in the development of a model of demands on nurses' time. Two major categories of demands included: Actions required of the nurse; and Characteristics of patients, families and physicians. A third subsidiary category included mediating conditions related to client characteristics. Actions included: empowering, integrating information, advocacy, and demonstration of competence. Characteristics included patient physical condition, family dynamics, resources available, coping skills, demographic characteristics, interpersonal and emotional states, previous experience with illness and hospitalization, and flexibility. Mediating characteristics include commitment, mutual respect, and physical presence. This study identified demands created by non-task needs of clients, an under-estimated workload parameter. The model reflects measurable parameters and viable options for inclusion in severity measurement systems. Next steps include developing and testing measurement and structural models of the direct and indirect impact of these demands on patient outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Model of Demands on Nursing Staff Related to Caring, Families, and Physiciansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152614-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Model of Demands on Nursing Staff Related to Caring, Families, and Physicians</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Houser, Janet, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Regis University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">A Model of Demands on Nursing Staff Related to Caring, Families, and Physicians</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jhouser@regis.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Rita Axford, PhD, RN; Lynn Wimett, EdD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Determining nurse workload is essential for appropriate resource allocation. Traditional workload assessments focus on quantifying tasks and assume that all value of nursing can be observed, timed, and counted. Such methods underestimate the complexity of professional nursing and are often unreliable. This research is the second in a series aimed at developing a comprehensive, population-based workload measurement tool. Previous research developed a model of environmental demands. The purpose of this specific study was to develop a model that describes the demands on nursing time that are driven by patients' caring needs, families, and physicians. This study used focus group methodologies with 14 groups in 6 hospitals and interview data from 96 registered nurses. Nurses represented acute inpatient, children's, and rehabilitation nursing in not-for-profit, for-profit, and teaching hospitals. Validity and reliability were addressed through member-checks, coding audits, inter-rater agreement calculations (using Cohen's Kappa) and interviews exploring contradictory and inconclusive responses. Adequate sample size was confirmed by achievement of saturation. Constant-comparison analytic methods were applied. Analysis resulted in the development of a model of demands on nurses' time. Two major categories of demands included: Actions required of the nurse; and Characteristics of patients, families and physicians. A third subsidiary category included mediating conditions related to client characteristics. Actions included: empowering, integrating information, advocacy, and demonstration of competence. Characteristics included patient physical condition, family dynamics, resources available, coping skills, demographic characteristics, interpersonal and emotional states, previous experience with illness and hospitalization, and flexibility. Mediating characteristics include commitment, mutual respect, and physical presence. This study identified demands created by non-task needs of clients, an under-estimated workload parameter. The model reflects measurable parameters and viable options for inclusion in severity measurement systems. Next steps include developing and testing measurement and structural models of the direct and indirect impact of these demands on patient outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:42:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:42:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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