2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152616
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluating English Language Skills Needed for Entry-Level Nursing
Abstract:
Evaluating English Language Skills Needed for Entry-Level Nursing
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Wendt, Anne, PhD, RN, CAE
P.I. Institution Name:National Council of State Boards of Nursing, Inc
Title:NCLEX Content Manager
Co-Authors:Casey Marks, PhD
Evaluating English Language Skills Needed for Entry-level Nursing The purpose of this study is to provide information so that nursing regulators can make policy decisions regarding the level of English language proficiency needed to practice nursing at the entry-level. This is a non-experimental study in which twenty-five nurses with varying backgrounds met in order to provide their expert opinions on the level of English proficiency that is needed to practice nursing at the entry-level. Two different methods of standard setting, the Simulated Minimally Competent Candidate (SMCC) and the Examinee Paper Selection Method, were used to set a passing standard on an English proficiency examination, the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFLS). Results of the study were used by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing's (NCSBN) Examination Committee to make a policy decision on the level of English proficiency needed by entry-level nurses (TOEFL score of 220). The results of the study have implications for those boards of nursing which choose to adopt the NCSBN recommendation as well as for those nurses seeking licensure in the United States. Furthermore, the findings have implications for the public and health care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluating English Language Skills Needed for Entry-Level Nursingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152616-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evaluating English Language Skills Needed for Entry-Level Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wendt, Anne, PhD, RN, CAE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">National Council of State Boards of Nursing, Inc</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">NCLEX Content Manager</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lkenny@ncsbn.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Casey Marks, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Evaluating English Language Skills Needed for Entry-level Nursing The purpose of this study is to provide information so that nursing regulators can make policy decisions regarding the level of English language proficiency needed to practice nursing at the entry-level. This is a non-experimental study in which twenty-five nurses with varying backgrounds met in order to provide their expert opinions on the level of English proficiency that is needed to practice nursing at the entry-level. Two different methods of standard setting, the Simulated Minimally Competent Candidate (SMCC) and the Examinee Paper Selection Method, were used to set a passing standard on an English proficiency examination, the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFLS). Results of the study were used by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing's (NCSBN) Examination Committee to make a policy decision on the level of English proficiency needed by entry-level nurses (TOEFL score of 220). The results of the study have implications for those boards of nursing which choose to adopt the NCSBN recommendation as well as for those nurses seeking licensure in the United States. Furthermore, the findings have implications for the public and health care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:43:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:43:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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