2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152627
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Environmental Health Threats to Rural Low-Income Children
Abstract:
Environmental Health Threats to Rural Low-Income Children
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Butterfield, Patricia, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Wade G. Hill, RN, PhD
There is evidence that children in rural Western communities may be disproportionally exposed to environmental agents associated with mining and agriculture. Such agents include lead, arsenic, and radon. Compared with children living in higher-income families, those with limited finances may encounter additional risks associated with parents' jobs (e.g., ôtake-home toxinsö) and substandard housing. Environmental Risk Reduction Through Nursing Interventions and Education (ERRNIE) is a phased randomized controlled trial designed to test a home-based intervention on adults' environmental knowledge and self-efficacy, and children's biomarkers of exposure. The research is informed by conceptual foundations from Dixon's Integrative Environmental Health Framework and the World Health Organization's Multiple Exposure-Multiple Effects (MEME) model. Because of variability in children's risks, it was important to develop a tailored intervention that mirrored each family's educational needs and exposure context. Development of the intervention included: 1) a literature review addressing environmental risk communication and agent-specific recommendations, 2) the collection of pilot data (n=31 families) addressing both risks and perceptions (e.g., thoughts and feelings), and 3) the collection of focus group data addressing parents' impressions of prototype intervention materials. These activities lead to the development of the final intervention, which included 10 standard and 5 tailored modules. Standard modules addressed prevention actions appropriate for all families and included topics such as, ôA Healthy Home,ö and ôTaking Stock of Your Household.ö Tailored modules addressed both risk magnitude (e.g., airborne radon ? or ? 4 pCi/L) and informational needs (e.g., ôcarbon monoxide can build up in homes that have wood stovesö). Rural low-income families comprise an underrepresented and understudied population in regard to environmental risks, despite evidence that many Superfund sites and other contaminated sites are located in small towns. Translational nursing research can fill an important gap in the applied sciences by examining families' perceptions and response to such risks.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnvironmental Health Threats to Rural Low-Income Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152627-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Environmental Health Threats to Rural Low-Income Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Butterfield, Patricia, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pbutter@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Wade G. Hill, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">There is evidence that children in rural Western communities may be disproportionally exposed to environmental agents associated with mining and agriculture. Such agents include lead, arsenic, and radon. Compared with children living in higher-income families, those with limited finances may encounter additional risks associated with parents' jobs (e.g., &ocirc;take-home toxins&ouml;) and substandard housing. Environmental Risk Reduction Through Nursing Interventions and Education (ERRNIE) is a phased randomized controlled trial designed to test a home-based intervention on adults' environmental knowledge and self-efficacy, and children's biomarkers of exposure. The research is informed by conceptual foundations from Dixon's Integrative Environmental Health Framework and the World Health Organization's Multiple Exposure-Multiple Effects (MEME) model. Because of variability in children's risks, it was important to develop a tailored intervention that mirrored each family's educational needs and exposure context. Development of the intervention included: 1) a literature review addressing environmental risk communication and agent-specific recommendations, 2) the collection of pilot data (n=31 families) addressing both risks and perceptions (e.g., thoughts and feelings), and 3) the collection of focus group data addressing parents' impressions of prototype intervention materials. These activities lead to the development of the final intervention, which included 10 standard and 5 tailored modules. Standard modules addressed prevention actions appropriate for all families and included topics such as, &ocirc;A Healthy Home,&ouml; and &ocirc;Taking Stock of Your Household.&ouml; Tailored modules addressed both risk magnitude (e.g., airborne radon ? or ? 4 pCi/L) and informational needs (e.g., &ocirc;carbon monoxide can build up in homes that have wood stoves&ouml;). Rural low-income families comprise an underrepresented and understudied population in regard to environmental risks, despite evidence that many Superfund sites and other contaminated sites are located in small towns. Translational nursing research can fill an important gap in the applied sciences by examining families' perceptions and response to such risks.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:43:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:43:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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