Meaning and Purpose in Life: The Perspectives of Elderly Post-Transplant Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152634
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Meaning and Purpose in Life: The Perspectives of Elderly Post-Transplant Women
Abstract:
Meaning and Purpose in Life: The Perspectives of Elderly Post-Transplant Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Evangelista, Lorraine
P.I. Institution Name:University of California-Los Angeles
Objectives: The primary purpose of the study was to describe meaning and life purpose, psychological well-being, and quality of life of elderly female heart transplant recipients. A secondary aim was to obtain participant's perspectives of meaning and life purpose as it relates to their quality of life following heart transplantation. Design: We used a technique of methodological triangulation (quantitative and qualitative) for data collection. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Cross-sectional data were collected from 33 heart transplantation female recipients >55 years old from a single heart transplantation clinic in the United States. Patients were 62.30±5.46 years and had undergone heart transplantation 4.60±4.79 years prior to study participation. They were predominantly Caucasians (69.7%), married (57.6%) and retired (87.9%). Concepts Studied: Meaning and life purpose, psychological well-being(dysphoria), and quality of life. Methods: Participants were asked to complete a series of questionnaires (Life Attitudes Profile, SF-12, Multiple Affect Adjective Checklist) and an open-ended, semi-structured interview. Descriptive statistics and Pearson correlations were used to characterize life purpose and meaning and identify relationships between key variables. Thematic analysis of linguistic data was used to describe women's perceptions related to meaning and life purpose. Findings: The study sample had low to moderate meaning (30.64±8.32, range 10-49), life purpose (40.12±13.78, range 17-63), and QOL (35.97±23.17, range 9-91) and high levels of anxiety (12.78±7.58, range 2-36), depression (21.85±5.57, range 7-37), and hostility (23.36±.5.57, range 8-30). Following heart transplantation patients described optimism, sense of fulfillment, self-transcendence, clear life goals, faith, and dedication to a cause as strong motivators for recovery. Conclusion: Our findings provide strong evidence for a clear relation between life purpose, meaning, psychological well-being, and QOL in elderly women following heart transplantation. Implication: Interventions that help support a sense of life purpose and meaning in this vulnerable population may be key to improved health perceptions and patient outcomes.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeaning and Purpose in Life: The Perspectives of Elderly Post-Transplant Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152634-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Meaning and Purpose in Life: The Perspectives of Elderly Post-Transplant Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Evangelista, Lorraine</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California-Los Angeles</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">levangel@ucla.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: The primary purpose of the study was to describe meaning and life purpose, psychological well-being, and quality of life of elderly female heart transplant recipients. A secondary aim was to obtain participant's perspectives of meaning and life purpose as it relates to their quality of life following heart transplantation. Design: We used a technique of methodological triangulation (quantitative and qualitative) for data collection. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Cross-sectional data were collected from 33 heart transplantation female recipients &gt;55 years old from a single heart transplantation clinic in the United States. Patients were 62.30&plusmn;5.46 years and had undergone heart transplantation 4.60&plusmn;4.79 years prior to study participation. They were predominantly Caucasians (69.7%), married (57.6%) and retired (87.9%). Concepts Studied: Meaning and life purpose, psychological well-being(dysphoria), and quality of life. Methods: Participants were asked to complete a series of questionnaires (Life Attitudes Profile, SF-12, Multiple Affect Adjective Checklist) and an open-ended, semi-structured interview. Descriptive statistics and Pearson correlations were used to characterize life purpose and meaning and identify relationships between key variables. Thematic analysis of linguistic data was used to describe women's perceptions related to meaning and life purpose. Findings: The study sample had low to moderate meaning (30.64&plusmn;8.32, range 10-49), life purpose (40.12&plusmn;13.78, range 17-63), and QOL (35.97&plusmn;23.17, range 9-91) and high levels of anxiety (12.78&plusmn;7.58, range 2-36), depression (21.85&plusmn;5.57, range 7-37), and hostility (23.36&plusmn;.5.57, range 8-30). Following heart transplantation patients described optimism, sense of fulfillment, self-transcendence, clear life goals, faith, and dedication to a cause as strong motivators for recovery. Conclusion: Our findings provide strong evidence for a clear relation between life purpose, meaning, psychological well-being, and QOL in elderly women following heart transplantation. Implication: Interventions that help support a sense of life purpose and meaning in this vulnerable population may be key to improved health perceptions and patient outcomes.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:43:43Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:43:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.