2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152639
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of a Peer Mentor-Tutor Program on Student Academic Outcomes
Abstract:
Effect of a Peer Mentor-Tutor Program on Student Academic Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Ramsey, Priscilla, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:East Tennessee State University
Title:Associate Professor
Objective: To investigate the effect of peer of peer mentoring and tutoring on nursing student academic outcomes. Design: A pre-post test design was used to measure outcome variables before and after participation in a peer mentor-tutor project. Population, setting, years: Disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged students (N=291)participated in a federally funded, three year project at a Southern Appalachian university. The project was centralized in the NURSE Center (Nursing Undergraduate Resource for Successful Education), in the college of nursing. Establishing and operating the Center was an integral component of the project. Intervention and outcome variables: Students participated in either the peer mentoring (n=108), peer tutoring (n=49) or both (n=157). The variables measured were disadvantaged (socioeconomic, SES) status, grades in key courses, retention rates, graduation rates, changes in grade point averages (GPAs), and first time NCLEX success rates during the three year period. Methods: Data was collected retrospectively at the end of the three year project for all participants. Descriptive or comparative analyses were used for the SES scale, course grades, retention and graduation rates, and NCLEX results data. Differences in GPAs between groups were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. Findings: The results of the SES scale indicated that 33% of students were disadvantaged based on income alone; 37.5% when other factors were considered. Disadvantaged student participation in the project ranged from more than 50% to 100%. The number of students requesting mentoring and tutoring increased from 16 in the first semester to 201 in the last semester. Visits to the NURSE Center increased from 250 to 1,529. Failure rates for key courses (pathophysiology, pharmacology, and health assessment) decreased from 16% (first time takers) to 5% (second time takers). The overall retention rate was 82%; 18% either failed out of nursing or changed majors. The graduation rate was 74% in five semesters (five semesters is required for the nursing major) and 21% graduated in six semesters, or a 95% total. Compared to the college wide graduation rate in six semesters, there was a 10% greater graduation rate of project participants. GPAs increased over the three year period from 3.02 to 3.08 (NS) for those who were mentored, 3.23 to 3.35 for those who were tutored (NS). For those who were both mentored and tutored, the GPAs increased from 2.99 to 3.14, a significant three year change (p<.05). Of the 119 project completers (graduates), 88% passed NCLEX the first time compared to 70% of nonparticipants. Conclusions: Based on the findings, peer mentoring and tutoring is an effective learning resource for nursing students, particularly disadvantaged students. Mentoring and tutoring for at risk students has better academic outcomes than either mentoring or tutoring alone. The improvement in pass rates in key courses, retention and graduation rates, GPAs, and NCLEX first time pass rates support peer mentoring and tutoring as an effective learning strategy. Implications: Peer mentor-tutor programs are components of a multifaceted approach to promote student learning, but there are also other positive outcomes. First, serving as a mentor or tutor is a strong indicator of leadership ability. They were more likely to be involved in student organizations and assume leadership positions. Second, interclass interaction was promoted through mentoring and tutoring, producing a highly positive and mutually beneficial collaboration within the college. Third, the student-centered learning environment of the NURSE Center enhanced course content comprehension that seemed attainable in the classroom alone for many students. Last, the peer mentor-tutor program is self-sustaining; as those who were mentored or tutored progress, they become mentors and tutors for others. "Being a part of someone's future," the student generated motto of the NURSE Center, was a consistent motivation for project mentors and tutors.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of a Peer Mentor-Tutor Program on Student Academic Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152639-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of a Peer Mentor-Tutor Program on Student Academic Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ramsey, Priscilla, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">East Tennessee State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ramsey@etsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To investigate the effect of peer of peer mentoring and tutoring on nursing student academic outcomes. Design: A pre-post test design was used to measure outcome variables before and after participation in a peer mentor-tutor project. Population, setting, years: Disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged students (N=291)participated in a federally funded, three year project at a Southern Appalachian university. The project was centralized in the NURSE Center (Nursing Undergraduate Resource for Successful Education), in the college of nursing. Establishing and operating the Center was an integral component of the project. Intervention and outcome variables: Students participated in either the peer mentoring (n=108), peer tutoring (n=49) or both (n=157). The variables measured were disadvantaged (socioeconomic, SES) status, grades in key courses, retention rates, graduation rates, changes in grade point averages (GPAs), and first time NCLEX success rates during the three year period. Methods: Data was collected retrospectively at the end of the three year project for all participants. Descriptive or comparative analyses were used for the SES scale, course grades, retention and graduation rates, and NCLEX results data. Differences in GPAs between groups were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. Findings: The results of the SES scale indicated that 33% of students were disadvantaged based on income alone; 37.5% when other factors were considered. Disadvantaged student participation in the project ranged from more than 50% to 100%. The number of students requesting mentoring and tutoring increased from 16 in the first semester to 201 in the last semester. Visits to the NURSE Center increased from 250 to 1,529. Failure rates for key courses (pathophysiology, pharmacology, and health assessment) decreased from 16% (first time takers) to 5% (second time takers). The overall retention rate was 82%; 18% either failed out of nursing or changed majors. The graduation rate was 74% in five semesters (five semesters is required for the nursing major) and 21% graduated in six semesters, or a 95% total. Compared to the college wide graduation rate in six semesters, there was a 10% greater graduation rate of project participants. GPAs increased over the three year period from 3.02 to 3.08 (NS) for those who were mentored, 3.23 to 3.35 for those who were tutored (NS). For those who were both mentored and tutored, the GPAs increased from 2.99 to 3.14, a significant three year change (p&lt;.05). Of the 119 project completers (graduates), 88% passed NCLEX the first time compared to 70% of nonparticipants. Conclusions: Based on the findings, peer mentoring and tutoring is an effective learning resource for nursing students, particularly disadvantaged students. Mentoring and tutoring for at risk students has better academic outcomes than either mentoring or tutoring alone. The improvement in pass rates in key courses, retention and graduation rates, GPAs, and NCLEX first time pass rates support peer mentoring and tutoring as an effective learning strategy. Implications: Peer mentor-tutor programs are components of a multifaceted approach to promote student learning, but there are also other positive outcomes. First, serving as a mentor or tutor is a strong indicator of leadership ability. They were more likely to be involved in student organizations and assume leadership positions. Second, interclass interaction was promoted through mentoring and tutoring, producing a highly positive and mutually beneficial collaboration within the college. Third, the student-centered learning environment of the NURSE Center enhanced course content comprehension that seemed attainable in the classroom alone for many students. Last, the peer mentor-tutor program is self-sustaining; as those who were mentored or tutored progress, they become mentors and tutors for others. &quot;Being a part of someone's future,&quot; the student generated motto of the NURSE Center, was a consistent motivation for project mentors and tutors.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:43:55Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:43:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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