Spirituality: A Predictor of Emotional and Physical Health of Rural Caregivers of Persons with Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152641
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Spirituality: A Predictor of Emotional and Physical Health of Rural Caregivers of Persons with Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias
Abstract:
Spirituality: A Predictor of Emotional and Physical Health of Rural Caregivers of Persons with Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Kaye, Judy, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE
P.I. Institution Name:University of South Carolina
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: Chronic stress is well documented among caregivers whose family members suffer from Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. Research supports the influence of spirituality in neutralizing the effects of an uncontrollable situation. Psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) studies support the connection between the mind and body's response to stress. The primary objective of this study was to determine the use of spirituality as a predictor of perceived stress, life satisfaction, social support satisfaction, and psychological and physiological caregiver health. Research Design: A cross-sectional, descriptive, design was used to study spirituality as a resource, and predictor of mediating variables (perceived stress, life satisfaction, and social support satisfaction) and emotional (depression) and physical health outcomes. Sample and Setting: A convenience sample of 130 caregivers providing care at home for a significant other with Alzheimer's disease or other dementia participated in this study. The study was conducted in rural communities in the Southeastern United States. Concepts and Instruments: Spirituality, defined as personal views and behaviors based on beliefs that express a person's relationship to a transcendent dimension or something greater than the self was operationalized by the Spiritual Perspective Scale. Stress, defined as a person's appraisal of demands as taxing exceeding his or her resources, and endangering his or her well-being was operationalized by the Perceived Stress Scale. Life Satisfaction, defined as satisfaction with life as currently experienced was measured with the Index of Well Being. Social Support Satisfaction, defined as contentment with various forms of aid and assistance supplied by family members, friends, neighbors, and support groups was operationalized with the Global Satisfaction Scale. Depression, defined as a mode of sadness that consists of feelings of hopelessness and helplessness as well as symptoms of lack of appetite, energy and rest was operationalized by the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Physical health was measured with a self-rated five-point scale ranging from excellent to poor. Self-rated health has been found to be a reliable indicator of objective physical status, is racially unbiased, and is predictive of mortality. Methods: Hierarchical regression was used to answer the following research questions: (1) What are predictors of stress, life satisfaction and social support satisfaction? (2) What are predictors of psychological (depression) and physiological caregiver health? Findings: Lower perceived caregiver stress was predicted by spirituality (p<0.001). Greater life satisfaction was predicted by higher education (p<0.01), lower cognitive impairment of the ill person (p<0.05), higher spirituality (p<0.001) and lower stress (p<0.001). Social support satisfaction was predicted by lower cognitive impairment of the ill person (p<0.001), lower stress (p<0.001), and higher life satisfaction (p<0.001). Higher depression was predicted by race (p<0.01), lower spirituality (p<0.05), higher stress (p<0.001), and lower social support satisfaction (p<0.001). Poor health was predicted by race (p<0.05), lower education and financial situation (p<0.05), lower spirituality (p<0.05), and higher depression (p<0.001). Conclusions: Greater spirituality predicted lower perceived stress, greater life satisfaction, lower depression, and better health. Higher education, lower cognitive impairment of the ill person, and lower stress predicted greater life satisfaction. Lower cognitive impairment of the afflicted, lower stress, and higher life satisfaction predicted greater satisfaction with social support. Race (Caucasian), higher stress, and lower satisfaction with social support predicted depression. Race (African-American), lower education, lower financial situation, and higher depression predicted poorer health. Implications: Spirituality is a valuable resource and may be utilized to decrease stress, lower depression, increase life satisfaction, and improve health among caregivers. Caregivers with greater cognitive abilities and education are better able to reframe their situation that results in greater life satisfaction and better health. Caregivers report greater life satisfaction when the afflicted person has less cognitive impairment and their situation is less stressful. Caucasian caregivers require careful assessment as they have fewer social support resources and experience higher stress and depression. Socio-economic disadvantaged (low education and income), African-American, and caregivers with higher levels of depression experience poorer health. Findings from this study provide a framework for assessment and individualized interventions to reduce caregiver's vulnerability, morbidity and mortality.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSpirituality: A Predictor of Emotional and Physical Health of Rural Caregivers of Persons with Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementiasen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152641-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Spirituality: A Predictor of Emotional and Physical Health of Rural Caregivers of Persons with Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kaye, Judy, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of South Carolina</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">judy.kaye@sc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Chronic stress is well documented among caregivers whose family members suffer from Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. Research supports the influence of spirituality in neutralizing the effects of an uncontrollable situation. Psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) studies support the connection between the mind and body's response to stress. The primary objective of this study was to determine the use of spirituality as a predictor of perceived stress, life satisfaction, social support satisfaction, and psychological and physiological caregiver health. Research Design: A cross-sectional, descriptive, design was used to study spirituality as a resource, and predictor of mediating variables (perceived stress, life satisfaction, and social support satisfaction) and emotional (depression) and physical health outcomes. Sample and Setting: A convenience sample of 130 caregivers providing care at home for a significant other with Alzheimer's disease or other dementia participated in this study. The study was conducted in rural communities in the Southeastern United States. Concepts and Instruments: Spirituality, defined as personal views and behaviors based on beliefs that express a person's relationship to a transcendent dimension or something greater than the self was operationalized by the Spiritual Perspective Scale. Stress, defined as a person's appraisal of demands as taxing exceeding his or her resources, and endangering his or her well-being was operationalized by the Perceived Stress Scale. Life Satisfaction, defined as satisfaction with life as currently experienced was measured with the Index of Well Being. Social Support Satisfaction, defined as contentment with various forms of aid and assistance supplied by family members, friends, neighbors, and support groups was operationalized with the Global Satisfaction Scale. Depression, defined as a mode of sadness that consists of feelings of hopelessness and helplessness as well as symptoms of lack of appetite, energy and rest was operationalized by the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Physical health was measured with a self-rated five-point scale ranging from excellent to poor. Self-rated health has been found to be a reliable indicator of objective physical status, is racially unbiased, and is predictive of mortality. Methods: Hierarchical regression was used to answer the following research questions: (1) What are predictors of stress, life satisfaction and social support satisfaction? (2) What are predictors of psychological (depression) and physiological caregiver health? Findings: Lower perceived caregiver stress was predicted by spirituality (p&lt;0.001). Greater life satisfaction was predicted by higher education (p&lt;0.01), lower cognitive impairment of the ill person (p&lt;0.05), higher spirituality (p&lt;0.001) and lower stress (p&lt;0.001). Social support satisfaction was predicted by lower cognitive impairment of the ill person (p&lt;0.001), lower stress (p&lt;0.001), and higher life satisfaction (p&lt;0.001). Higher depression was predicted by race (p&lt;0.01), lower spirituality (p&lt;0.05), higher stress (p&lt;0.001), and lower social support satisfaction (p&lt;0.001). Poor health was predicted by race (p&lt;0.05), lower education and financial situation (p&lt;0.05), lower spirituality (p&lt;0.05), and higher depression (p&lt;0.001). Conclusions: Greater spirituality predicted lower perceived stress, greater life satisfaction, lower depression, and better health. Higher education, lower cognitive impairment of the ill person, and lower stress predicted greater life satisfaction. Lower cognitive impairment of the afflicted, lower stress, and higher life satisfaction predicted greater satisfaction with social support. Race (Caucasian), higher stress, and lower satisfaction with social support predicted depression. Race (African-American), lower education, lower financial situation, and higher depression predicted poorer health. Implications: Spirituality is a valuable resource and may be utilized to decrease stress, lower depression, increase life satisfaction, and improve health among caregivers. Caregivers with greater cognitive abilities and education are better able to reframe their situation that results in greater life satisfaction and better health. Caregivers report greater life satisfaction when the afflicted person has less cognitive impairment and their situation is less stressful. Caucasian caregivers require careful assessment as they have fewer social support resources and experience higher stress and depression. Socio-economic disadvantaged (low education and income), African-American, and caregivers with higher levels of depression experience poorer health. Findings from this study provide a framework for assessment and individualized interventions to reduce caregiver's vulnerability, morbidity and mortality.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:44:00Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:44:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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