2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152666
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ethnic Differences and Similarities in Influences on Young Men's Condom Use
Abstract:
Ethnic Differences and Similarities in Influences on Young Men's Condom Use
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Conference Date:July 10-12, 2003
Author:Norris, Anne, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Boston CollegeSchool of Nursing
Title:
Co-Authors:Raymond E. Phillips
Objective: To examine role of ethnic differences in explaining young men's condom use at last intercourse.<P> Design: Descriptive, cross-sectional.<P> Population: Enlisted male, Navy personnel, E4 paygrade and below, deployed on an aircraft carrier in 2002 (mean age = 22 years). Response rate was 65%. Data presented here are from three largest ethnic subgroups: Anglo (n = 614), Latino (n = 209), African American (n = 186). <P> Concepts: The study's theoretical framework integrates concepts from three health behavior models: Theory of Reasoned Action (beliefs, attitude, norms), Social Cognitive Theory (self-efficacy), and Construct Accessibility Model (accessibility of condom related constructs in memory).<P> Methods: Survey questionnaire was anonymous, took approximately 15 minutes to complete, and was distributed with a self-sealing manila envelope. <P> Findings: African American men had higher self-efficacy (mean(SE) = 2.59, SD = 1.10) and less negative attitude (mean(A)=2.83, SD=1.62) than Anglo men (mean(SE) = 2.35, SD = .99; mean(A) = 3.25, SD = 1.44; p < .05). Latino men (mean(SE) = 2.45, SD=.96; mean(A) = 3.22, SD = 1.53) fell midway, but did not differ significantly from either group (p > .06). No other univariate, ethnic differences were observed.<P> Logistic regression results indicated accessibility of condom related constructs in memory had a significant influence on condom use in all three groups (p < .001). Negative condom attitude was significant for Latino and Anglo subjects (p < .05), and belief about negative interpersonal aspects of condoms was significant for Anglo subjects only (p < .01). <P> Conclusion: Ethnic groups were more similar than different in their scores on theoretical predictors of condom use, but effects of variables such as attitudes or beliefs did vary with ethnicity. However, effect of information processing variables (e.g., accessibility of condom related constructs) did not vary with ethnicity.<P> Implications: Understanding ethnic similarities and differences in influences on health behavior is critical to designing more effective nursing interventions. <!--Abstract 13574 modified by 136.167.110.98 on 11-5-2002--></P></P></P></P></P></P></P></P>
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Jul-2003
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEthnic Differences and Similarities in Influences on Young Men's Condom Useen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152666-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Ethnic Differences and Similarities in Influences on Young Men's Condom Use</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 10-12, 2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Norris, Anne, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Boston CollegeSchool of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value"> </td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value"> </td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Raymond E. Phillips</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To examine role of ethnic differences in explaining young men's condom use at last intercourse.&lt;P&gt; Design: Descriptive, cross-sectional.&lt;P&gt; Population: Enlisted male, Navy personnel, E4 paygrade and below, deployed on an aircraft carrier in 2002 (mean age = 22 years). Response rate was 65%. Data presented here are from three largest ethnic subgroups: Anglo (n = 614), Latino (n = 209), African American (n = 186). &lt;P&gt; Concepts: The study's theoretical framework integrates concepts from three health behavior models: Theory of Reasoned Action (beliefs, attitude, norms), Social Cognitive Theory (self-efficacy), and Construct Accessibility Model (accessibility of condom related constructs in memory).&lt;P&gt; Methods: Survey questionnaire was anonymous, took approximately 15 minutes to complete, and was distributed with a self-sealing manila envelope. &lt;P&gt; Findings: African American men had higher self-efficacy (mean(SE) = 2.59, SD = 1.10) and less negative attitude (mean(A)=2.83, SD=1.62) than Anglo men (mean(SE) = 2.35, SD = .99; mean(A) = 3.25, SD = 1.44; p &lt; .05). Latino men (mean(SE) = 2.45, SD=.96; mean(A) = 3.22, SD = 1.53) fell midway, but did not differ significantly from either group (p &gt; .06). No other univariate, ethnic differences were observed.&lt;P&gt; Logistic regression results indicated accessibility of condom related constructs in memory had a significant influence on condom use in all three groups (p &lt; .001). Negative condom attitude was significant for Latino and Anglo subjects (p &lt; .05), and belief about negative interpersonal aspects of condoms was significant for Anglo subjects only (p &lt; .01). &lt;P&gt; Conclusion: Ethnic groups were more similar than different in their scores on theoretical predictors of condom use, but effects of variables such as attitudes or beliefs did vary with ethnicity. However, effect of information processing variables (e.g., accessibility of condom related constructs) did not vary with ethnicity.&lt;P&gt; Implications: Understanding ethnic similarities and differences in influences on health behavior is critical to designing more effective nursing interventions. &lt;!--Abstract 13574 modified by 136.167.110.98 on 11-5-2002--&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:45:01Z-
dc.date.issued2003-07-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:45:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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