Nursing Case Management to Treat Abused Women: Results of a RCT of 360 African-American, White, and Hispanic Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152676
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Case Management to Treat Abused Women: Results of a RCT of 360 African-American, White, and Hispanic Women
Abstract:
Nursing Case Management to Treat Abused Women: Results of a RCT of 360 African-American, White, and Hispanic Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Conference Date:July 10-12, 2003
Author:McFarlane, Judith
P.I. Institution Name:Texas Woman's University
OBJECTIVE: To assess the safety behaviors, use of community resources, physical and psychological functioning and employment productivity of abused women following a nursing case management intervention versus usual care. <P> DESIGN: Randomized clinical trial with random assignment to control (usual care) or nursing case management and repeated measures at 6, 12, 18 and 24 months.<P> POPULATION, SAMPLE, SETTING: 360 African-American, White, and Hispanic women served in two public primary care clinics that screened positive for intimate partner abuse within the last 12 months compose the studied population. <P> CONCEPT STUDIED: Case Management, as defined by ANA (1988), as a system of care coordinated across agencies, outcome-oriented, resource efficient, and collaborative with others in the care system has proven effective toward improving quality of care and achieving cost savings with a variety of different patient groups; however, no published reports were identified that used a case management approach with abused women. <P> METHODS: Levels of abuse were measured for each woman as well as safety behaviors, use of community resources for violence, and standard indices of physical and mental health. Control group women were offered usual care. Women in the intervention group were offered a 10-minute safety plan, crisis intervention, supportive care, anticipatory guidance, and guided referral options, followed by monthly case management contact for additional safety planning, crisis intervention, supportive care, anticipatory guidance and guided referrals <P> FINDINGS: Six month findings will be completed in February 2003 and reported at the conference. <P> CONCLUSIONS: Violence against women has been identified as a significant public health problem in the United States, with a specific objective to reduce the rate of intimate partner physical assaults 20% by 2010. This tested nurse case management model is offered as a treatment strategy adaptable to a variety of clinical settings that can potentially interrupt existing abuse and prevent further trauma. <P> <!--Abstract 13894 modified by 66.141.146.19 on 11-5-2002--></P></P></P></P></P></P></P>
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Jul-2003
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Case Management to Treat Abused Women: Results of a RCT of 360 African-American, White, and Hispanic Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152676-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Case Management to Treat Abused Women: Results of a RCT of 360 African-American, White, and Hispanic Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 10-12, 2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McFarlane, Judith</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Texas Woman's University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jmcfarlane@twu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">OBJECTIVE: To assess the safety behaviors, use of community resources, physical and psychological functioning and employment productivity of abused women following a nursing case management intervention versus usual care. &lt;P&gt; DESIGN: Randomized clinical trial with random assignment to control (usual care) or nursing case management and repeated measures at 6, 12, 18 and 24 months.&lt;P&gt; POPULATION, SAMPLE, SETTING: 360 African-American, White, and Hispanic women served in two public primary care clinics that screened positive for intimate partner abuse within the last 12 months compose the studied population. &lt;P&gt; CONCEPT STUDIED: Case Management, as defined by ANA (1988), as a system of care coordinated across agencies, outcome-oriented, resource efficient, and collaborative with others in the care system has proven effective toward improving quality of care and achieving cost savings with a variety of different patient groups; however, no published reports were identified that used a case management approach with abused women. &lt;P&gt; METHODS: Levels of abuse were measured for each woman as well as safety behaviors, use of community resources for violence, and standard indices of physical and mental health. Control group women were offered usual care. Women in the intervention group were offered a 10-minute safety plan, crisis intervention, supportive care, anticipatory guidance, and guided referral options, followed by monthly case management contact for additional safety planning, crisis intervention, supportive care, anticipatory guidance and guided referrals &lt;P&gt; FINDINGS: Six month findings will be completed in February 2003 and reported at the conference. &lt;P&gt; CONCLUSIONS: Violence against women has been identified as a significant public health problem in the United States, with a specific objective to reduce the rate of intimate partner physical assaults 20% by 2010. This tested nurse case management model is offered as a treatment strategy adaptable to a variety of clinical settings that can potentially interrupt existing abuse and prevent further trauma. &lt;P&gt; &lt;!--Abstract 13894 modified by 66.141.146.19 on 11-5-2002--&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:45:26Z-
dc.date.issued2003-07-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:45:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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