2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152678
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Family and Community Influences on Infant Feeding Practices
Abstract:
Family and Community Influences on Infant Feeding Practices
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Barton, Sharon, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kentucky
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Judi Daniels, RN, MS
Objective: The purpose of this paper is to report findings from the first wave of interviews in a study of family and cultural influences on infant feeding practices. Design: The study is a longitudinal ethnography. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: A purposive sample of 11 families was selected from health clinics in rural Appalachian counties in the USA. The study is funded by grant number 1R15 NR08216-01 from NIH/NINR, 2002-2004. The counties represent some of the lowest socioeconomic areas of the USA. Concept or Variable Studied: Cultural influences on infant feeding were examined as well as personal and contextual factors influencing initial feeding decisions and the introduction of solid foods, juices, and other beverages. Methods: Data were collected during in-depth interviews with mothers and other caregivers at three points during the infant’s first year of life. Additional fieldwork consisted of home observations, interviews with community leaders in child nutrition, and assessment of food availability in the community. Findings: During the first three months of life, the majority of infants received formula and solid foods. Breastfeeding was uncommon. Cow’s milk was fed before the first birthday. Mothers who breastfed received strong support to breastfeed from their immediate family. Community leaders were frustrated with infant feeding practices and felt that educational efforts had done little to change behaviors. Nutritionally deficient foods such as potato chips, sugary sweets, carbonated beverages, and juices were abundant in the community and were fed to infants. Parents believed their infants would grow and develop despite the poor quality of their diet. Conclusion: Infant feeding practices did not follow World Health Organization recommendations and may lead to future health problems such as obesity and diabetes. Implications: Interventions to improve childhood nutrition and prevent development of childhood obesity must begin at or before birth.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamily and Community Influences on Infant Feeding Practicesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152678-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Family and Community Influences on Infant Feeding Practices</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Barton, Sharon, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kentucky</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sharon.barton@uky.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judi Daniels, RN, MS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this paper is to report findings from the first wave of interviews in a study of family and cultural influences on infant feeding practices. Design: The study is a longitudinal ethnography. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: A purposive sample of 11 families was selected from health clinics in rural Appalachian counties in the USA. The study is funded by grant number 1R15 NR08216-01 from NIH/NINR, 2002-2004. The counties represent some of the lowest socioeconomic areas of the USA. Concept or Variable Studied: Cultural influences on infant feeding were examined as well as personal and contextual factors influencing initial feeding decisions and the introduction of solid foods, juices, and other beverages. Methods: Data were collected during in-depth interviews with mothers and other caregivers at three points during the infant&rsquo;s first year of life. Additional fieldwork consisted of home observations, interviews with community leaders in child nutrition, and assessment of food availability in the community. Findings: During the first three months of life, the majority of infants received formula and solid foods. Breastfeeding was uncommon. Cow&rsquo;s milk was fed before the first birthday. Mothers who breastfed received strong support to breastfeed from their immediate family. Community leaders were frustrated with infant feeding practices and felt that educational efforts had done little to change behaviors. Nutritionally deficient foods such as potato chips, sugary sweets, carbonated beverages, and juices were abundant in the community and were fed to infants. Parents believed their infants would grow and develop despite the poor quality of their diet. Conclusion: Infant feeding practices did not follow World Health Organization recommendations and may lead to future health problems such as obesity and diabetes. Implications: Interventions to improve childhood nutrition and prevent development of childhood obesity must begin at or before birth.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:45:31Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:45:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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