2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152689
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Bolstering an Aging Nursing Workforce
Abstract:
Bolstering an Aging Nursing Workforce
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Cleary, Brenda L., RN, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:NC Center for Nursing
BOLSTERING AN AGING NURSING WORKFORCE The mission of the North Carolina Center for Nursing is to assure adequate nursing resources to meet the healthcare needs of North Carolinians. Attracting new entrants to the profession of nursing is an important, but insufficient strategy for addressing a looming nursing workforce crisis. The stage is set for large numbers of experienced nurses to leave the labor pool just as the demand for nursing care reaches an all time high, owing to the demographics of our society in general. How can we create healthy workplaces that encourage nurses in their 60s and beyond to remain in the workforce longer to provide expertise in caring for older, more complex patients, mentor new nursing graduates, and sustain institutional memory? To address this issue, the NC Center for Nursing conducted a statewide sample survey of RNs and LPNs, ages 45 to 70, to ascertain intentions to retire and factors related to their desire and willingness to remain in the labor force. 359 RNs and 286 LPNs responded to the survey, for a total response rate of over 60%. The median age of planned retirement for both groups, regardless of healthcare setting was 65. The most important factors related to longer retention were better compensation, scheduling, and staffing. This presentation will detail these and other significant findings related to nurse workforce planning and policy development.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBolstering an Aging Nursing Workforceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152689-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Bolstering an Aging Nursing Workforce</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cleary, Brenda L., RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">NC Center for Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bcleary@northcarolina.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">BOLSTERING AN AGING NURSING WORKFORCE The mission of the North Carolina Center for Nursing is to assure adequate nursing resources to meet the healthcare needs of North Carolinians. Attracting new entrants to the profession of nursing is an important, but insufficient strategy for addressing a looming nursing workforce crisis. The stage is set for large numbers of experienced nurses to leave the labor pool just as the demand for nursing care reaches an all time high, owing to the demographics of our society in general. How can we create healthy workplaces that encourage nurses in their 60s and beyond to remain in the workforce longer to provide expertise in caring for older, more complex patients, mentor new nursing graduates, and sustain institutional memory? To address this issue, the NC Center for Nursing conducted a statewide sample survey of RNs and LPNs, ages 45 to 70, to ascertain intentions to retire and factors related to their desire and willingness to remain in the labor force. 359 RNs and 286 LPNs responded to the survey, for a total response rate of over 60%. The median age of planned retirement for both groups, regardless of healthcare setting was 65. The most important factors related to longer retention were better compensation, scheduling, and staffing. This presentation will detail these and other significant findings related to nurse workforce planning and policy development.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:45:58Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:45:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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