Comparing U.S. Home Care and New Zealand District Nurses on Valued Organizational Traits

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152696
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparing U.S. Home Care and New Zealand District Nurses on Valued Organizational Traits
Abstract:
Comparing U.S. Home Care and New Zealand District Nurses on Valued Organizational Traits
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Flynn, Linda, PhD, RN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Rutgers University
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Jenny Carryer, PhD, FCNA, MNZM; Claire Budge, PhD
Objective: The Nursing Work Index (NWI), a tool measuring the hospital practice environment, facilitated a decade of magnet hospital research highlighting the impact of organizational traits on nurse and patient outcomes. Little is known, however, regarding the degree to which this instrument reflects organizational traits valued by community-based nurses around the globe. The objective of this international study, funded by grants from the American Nurses Foundation and the New Zealand Ministry of Health, was to compare the responses of U.S. home care nurses with those of district nurses in New Zealand regarding the value of organizational traits, as depicted by the NWI, to their practice. Design: Cross-sectional mailed survey. Sample: The total sample of 723 community-based nurses comprised of 403 home care nurses from 48 states, and 320 New Zealand district nurses representing all 15 national regions. Variables: Organizational traits associated with a professional practice environment as measured by the "importance" scale of the NWI. Methods: Using the "importance" scale of the NWI, respondents rated the importance of each organizational trait to their professional practice. Analytic techniques included frequency distributions and one-way analysis of variance. Findings: A minimum of 90% of all U.S. home care and 90% of all New Zealand district nurses agreed that 44 of the 50 organizational traits depicted by the NWI were either somewhat or very important to the support of their professional practice. District nurses had significantly higher mean importance scores on the total NWI than did home care nurses. Conclusions: These 44 items may represent a core set of organizational traits important to community-based nurses from two different countries and health care systems. Implications: Overall, the NWI appears to reflect organizational traits important to both home care nurses and district nurses, suggesting a common professional value system may transcend practice settings and national boundaries.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparing U.S. Home Care and New Zealand District Nurses on Valued Organizational Traitsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152696-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparing U.S. Home Care and New Zealand District Nurses on Valued Organizational Traits</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Flynn, Linda, PhD, RN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Rutgers University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">flynn@nightingale.rutgers.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jenny Carryer, PhD, FCNA, MNZM; Claire Budge, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The Nursing Work Index (NWI), a tool measuring the hospital practice environment, facilitated a decade of magnet hospital research highlighting the impact of organizational traits on nurse and patient outcomes. Little is known, however, regarding the degree to which this instrument reflects organizational traits valued by community-based nurses around the globe. The objective of this international study, funded by grants from the American Nurses Foundation and the New Zealand Ministry of Health, was to compare the responses of U.S. home care nurses with those of district nurses in New Zealand regarding the value of organizational traits, as depicted by the NWI, to their practice. Design: Cross-sectional mailed survey. Sample: The total sample of 723 community-based nurses comprised of 403 home care nurses from 48 states, and 320 New Zealand district nurses representing all 15 national regions. Variables: Organizational traits associated with a professional practice environment as measured by the &quot;importance&quot; scale of the NWI. Methods: Using the &quot;importance&quot; scale of the NWI, respondents rated the importance of each organizational trait to their professional practice. Analytic techniques included frequency distributions and one-way analysis of variance. Findings: A minimum of 90% of all U.S. home care and 90% of all New Zealand district nurses agreed that 44 of the 50 organizational traits depicted by the NWI were either somewhat or very important to the support of their professional practice. District nurses had significantly higher mean importance scores on the total NWI than did home care nurses. Conclusions: These 44 items may represent a core set of organizational traits important to community-based nurses from two different countries and health care systems. Implications: Overall, the NWI appears to reflect organizational traits important to both home care nurses and district nurses, suggesting a common professional value system may transcend practice settings and national boundaries.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:46:16Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:46:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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