2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152699
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Historical Research: Where are the Data?
Abstract:
Historical Research: Where are the Data?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Gilbride, Jonathan, MSN, CCRN, FNP
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing
Title:Doctoral Student
Objective: This presentation discusses the types of printed data sources used in historical research; considers methods of identifying and accessing data; examines standards of reliability and validity with historical data; and considers cultural concerns for data access and analysis. Implications: In historical research, data include primary and secondary sources. Primary sources include documents such as memos, professional organization minutes, legislative committee reports, journals, newspapers, demographic data, government documents, philanthropic foundation studies, letters, films, diaries, video and audio recordings of events, and pictures. Secondary data sources generally consist of published historiographies. Identifying where data collections are housed is a major aspect of any history project. Important data may be identified in public and private libraries, formal archives, or even personal papers kept in private homes. Common and creative methods for identifying sources and the problem of missing data will be discussed. Accessing data sources varies with the location of the data. The presenter will identify issues related to accessing data in public and private libraries, archives, private collections, and internet sources. Like other research methods, measures of reliability and validity of data are important in historical research, since threats to reliability and validity can jeopardize the quality and accuracy of the research findings. Reliability and validity in historical research is understood and determined in quite different ways from other research methods and an explanation of these differences will be presented.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHistorical Research: Where are the Data?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152699-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Historical Research: Where are the Data?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gilbride, Jonathan, MSN, CCRN, FNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jgill@nursing.upenn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This presentation discusses the types of printed data sources used in historical research; considers methods of identifying and accessing data; examines standards of reliability and validity with historical data; and considers cultural concerns for data access and analysis. Implications: In historical research, data include primary and secondary sources. Primary sources include documents such as memos, professional organization minutes, legislative committee reports, journals, newspapers, demographic data, government documents, philanthropic foundation studies, letters, films, diaries, video and audio recordings of events, and pictures. Secondary data sources generally consist of published historiographies. Identifying where data collections are housed is a major aspect of any history project. Important data may be identified in public and private libraries, formal archives, or even personal papers kept in private homes. Common and creative methods for identifying sources and the problem of missing data will be discussed. Accessing data sources varies with the location of the data. The presenter will identify issues related to accessing data in public and private libraries, archives, private collections, and internet sources. Like other research methods, measures of reliability and validity of data are important in historical research, since threats to reliability and validity can jeopardize the quality and accuracy of the research findings. Reliability and validity in historical research is understood and determined in quite different ways from other research methods and an explanation of these differences will be presented.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:46:22Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:46:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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