A Grounded Theory Path Model to Mental Health Service Use -- Facilitating a Culture Accommodation Access Model in an African-American Community

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152703
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Grounded Theory Path Model to Mental Health Service Use -- Facilitating a Culture Accommodation Access Model in an African-American Community
Abstract:
A Grounded Theory Path Model to Mental Health Service Use -- Facilitating a Culture Accommodation Access Model in an African-American Community
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Hines-Martin, Vicki, RN, PhD, CS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Louisville
Title:assistant professor, nursing
Objective: To describe a model of mental health service use that identifies culture specific influences on mental health service (MHS) access in an African American community. Design: Grounded theory was utilized to examine community and contextual factors related to MHS use. Triangulation with quantitative data was used to examine individual factors influencing use of MHS. Sample, Setting, Years: The study was conducted from 2000-2003 in a southern metropolitan area. Subjects (n=117; male = 45 [38.5%] and female = 72 [61.5%]) were adults who voluntarily accessed publicly funded mental health services for the first time within the previous 12-months. A sub-sample of 24 subjects was used to collect qualitative data. Concept or Variables studied: Pathways to access were examined through interview, and individual determinants of MHS use were examined using quantitative measures – demographic data, racial identity (Helms RAIS), attitudes toward psychological help (Fischer ATSPPHS-Revised), symptom identification, and length of illness prior to access. Methods: Subjects were recruited at inpatient and outpatient MHS through MHS providers. Qualitative data were collected using an 11-item semi-structured interview guide. During the single interview, quantitative data were also collected. All data were analyzed using computer software for data management. A reiterative process until saturation of data was used to analyze qualitative data. Findings: Subjects exhibited contextual and behavioral patterns that greatly influenced the path to MHS. Multiple internal and external barriers were factors including familiarity with services (p=.004) and racial attitudes (p=.04). Conclusions/Implications: This study described a process that reflects reported experiences of a community of African American consumers. It provides a picture of the path to MHS use within an underserved and diverse group experiencing health disparities in the U.S. Understanding this process and examining its utility toward improving MHS access can build a bridge toward translating research into improved community care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Grounded Theory Path Model to Mental Health Service Use -- Facilitating a Culture Accommodation Access Model in an African-American Communityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152703-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Grounded Theory Path Model to Mental Health Service Use -- Facilitating a Culture Accommodation Access Model in an African-American Community</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hines-Martin, Vicki, RN, PhD, CS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Louisville</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">assistant professor, nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vphine01@louisville.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To describe a model of mental health service use that identifies culture specific influences on mental health service (MHS) access in an African American community. Design: Grounded theory was utilized to examine community and contextual factors related to MHS use. Triangulation with quantitative data was used to examine individual factors influencing use of MHS. Sample, Setting, Years: The study was conducted from 2000-2003 in a southern metropolitan area. Subjects (n=117; male = 45 [38.5%] and female = 72 [61.5%]) were adults who voluntarily accessed publicly funded mental health services for the first time within the previous 12-months. A sub-sample of 24 subjects was used to collect qualitative data. Concept or Variables studied: Pathways to access were examined through interview, and individual determinants of MHS use were examined using quantitative measures &ndash; demographic data, racial identity (Helms RAIS), attitudes toward psychological help (Fischer ATSPPHS-Revised), symptom identification, and length of illness prior to access. Methods: Subjects were recruited at inpatient and outpatient MHS through MHS providers. Qualitative data were collected using an 11-item semi-structured interview guide. During the single interview, quantitative data were also collected. All data were analyzed using computer software for data management. A reiterative process until saturation of data was used to analyze qualitative data. Findings: Subjects exhibited contextual and behavioral patterns that greatly influenced the path to MHS. Multiple internal and external barriers were factors including familiarity with services (p=.004) and racial attitudes (p=.04). Conclusions/Implications: This study described a process that reflects reported experiences of a community of African American consumers. It provides a picture of the path to MHS use within an underserved and diverse group experiencing health disparities in the U.S. Understanding this process and examining its utility toward improving MHS access can build a bridge toward translating research into improved community care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:46:32Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:46:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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