2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152714
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of an End-of-Life Educational Conference
Abstract:
Evaluation of an End-of-Life Educational Conference
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Kurz, Jane M., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Temple University
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Evelyn R. Hayes, PhD, RN, CS-FNP
Objective: To evaluate an End-Of-Life (EOL) Educational Program on registered nurses’ death anxiety, death attitudes and advance directives over time Design: Quasi-experimental Population: Registered nurses at 2 different conferences were invited to participate. Intervention group included 26 at the pre-test, 15 at post-test 1 and 11 at post-test2 and 3. Control group included 34 at time 1, and 22 at time 2 and 16 at time 3. Both groups were similar. Study occurred between October 2002 and November 2003. Concepts Studied: The study, based on General Systems Theory, focused on registered nurses who take inputs (i.e.,information) and produce outputs in the form of a change in anxiety, attitudes or behaviors. Methods: A demographic sheet, The Revised Death Anxiety Scale (RDAS), and The Death Attitude Profile-revised (DAP-R), were mailed. EOL program participants completed surveys prior to and immediately, 6 months and 12 months after the program. A control group completed the same surveys at the same times. Findings: Initially, 40% of the research group and 33% of the control group had advance directives but one year later 45% and 44%, respectively, had these. Originally, there were no differences with death anxiety or attitude between the research group and the control group. In the research group paired t-tests showed no statistically significant differences with death anxiety at pre-test, post-test 1 and post-test 3. There was a reduction in death anxiety at post-test 2 for the research group (t=-2.65, p=.02). Death attitude each time remained unchanged. Control group had no changes in death anxiety or death attitude scores. Conclusions: Program effects are not detected immediately. Deceased anxiety is not sustained over time. The EOL program did not increase death anxiety. Implications: Repeated interventions are needed to effect long-term changes. Future studies should include using a different death attitude survey and triangulating designs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of an End-of-Life Educational Conferenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152714-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evaluation of an End-of-Life Educational Conference</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kurz, Jane M., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Temple University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jkurz@temple.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Evelyn R. Hayes, PhD, RN, CS-FNP</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To evaluate an End-Of-Life (EOL) Educational Program on registered nurses&rsquo; death anxiety, death attitudes and advance directives over time Design: Quasi-experimental Population: Registered nurses at 2 different conferences were invited to participate. Intervention group included 26 at the pre-test, 15 at post-test 1 and 11 at post-test2 and 3. Control group included 34 at time 1, and 22 at time 2 and 16 at time 3. Both groups were similar. Study occurred between October 2002 and November 2003. Concepts Studied: The study, based on General Systems Theory, focused on registered nurses who take inputs (i.e.,information) and produce outputs in the form of a change in anxiety, attitudes or behaviors. Methods: A demographic sheet, The Revised Death Anxiety Scale (RDAS), and The Death Attitude Profile-revised (DAP-R), were mailed. EOL program participants completed surveys prior to and immediately, 6 months and 12 months after the program. A control group completed the same surveys at the same times. Findings: Initially, 40% of the research group and 33% of the control group had advance directives but one year later 45% and 44%, respectively, had these. Originally, there were no differences with death anxiety or attitude between the research group and the control group. In the research group paired t-tests showed no statistically significant differences with death anxiety at pre-test, post-test 1 and post-test 3. There was a reduction in death anxiety at post-test 2 for the research group (t=-2.65, p=.02). Death attitude each time remained unchanged. Control group had no changes in death anxiety or death attitude scores. Conclusions: Program effects are not detected immediately. Deceased anxiety is not sustained over time. The EOL program did not increase death anxiety. Implications: Repeated interventions are needed to effect long-term changes. Future studies should include using a different death attitude survey and triangulating designs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:46:58Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:46:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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