Cross-Cultural Comparison of Workplace Stressors, Ways of Coping, and Demographic Characteristics as Predictors of Physical and Mental Health Among Hospital Nurses in Japan, Thailand, South Korea, and the USA (Hawaii)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152715
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cross-Cultural Comparison of Workplace Stressors, Ways of Coping, and Demographic Characteristics as Predictors of Physical and Mental Health Among Hospital Nurses in Japan, Thailand, South Korea, and the USA (Hawaii)
Abstract:
Cross-Cultural Comparison of Workplace Stressors, Ways of Coping, and Demographic Characteristics as Predictors of Physical and Mental Health Among Hospital Nurses in Japan, Thailand, South Korea, and the USA (Hawaii)
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Lambert, Vickie A., DNSc, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Lambert & Lambert Nursing Consultants, Inc
Title:Dean Emeritus and International Nursing Consultant
Co-Authors:Clinton E. Lambert, PhD, RN, CS, FAAN
Objective: To cross-culturally compare workplace stressors, ways of coping and demographic characteristics as predictors of physical and mental health among hospital nurses in Japan, Thailand, South Korea and the USA (Hawaii). Design: Self-report survey. Sample, Setting & Years: Hospital nurses (n = 1554) working between March 2002 and January 2003. Variables Studied: Independent variables: a) workplace stressors, b) ways of coping and, c) demographic characteristics. Dependent variables: a) level of physical health and b) level of mental health. Method: Administration of four valid and reliable questionnaires (Demographic Questionnaire, “Nursing Stress Scale,” “Ways of Coping Questionnaire,” and SF-36 Health Survey”) translated into the nurses’ native language. Findings: Workload and number of people in the household were predictors for Japanese nurses’ physical health, while likelihood to leave the current nursing position, lack of support and escape-avoidance were predictors for their mental health. Seeking social support and likelihood to leave the current nursing position were predictors of South Korean nurses’ physical health, while age, distancing, workload, likelihood to leave the current nursing position and planful problem solving predicted mental health. Number of people residing in the household, number of years worked as a nurse and level of household income constituted predictors of Thai nurses’ physical health, while conflict with physicians, likelihood to leave the current nursing position, escape-avoidance and lack of support were predictors of mental health. Workload, likelihood to leave the current nursing position, highest educational level and escape-avoidance were predictors of the USA (Hawaii) nurses’ physical health, while escape-avoidance, conflict with other nurses, likelihood to leave the current nursing position, positive reappraisal, lack of support, distancing and workload predicted mental health. Conclusions: Nurses demonstrate cross-cultural similarities in predictors of physical and mental health. Implications: Unless role stress issues are confronted, hospital nurses’ physical and mental health will continue to be compromised.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCross-Cultural Comparison of Workplace Stressors, Ways of Coping, and Demographic Characteristics as Predictors of Physical and Mental Health Among Hospital Nurses in Japan, Thailand, South Korea, and the USA (Hawaii)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152715-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cross-Cultural Comparison of Workplace Stressors, Ways of Coping, and Demographic Characteristics as Predictors of Physical and Mental Health Among Hospital Nurses in Japan, Thailand, South Korea, and the USA (Hawaii)</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lambert, Vickie A., DNSc, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Lambert &amp; Lambert Nursing Consultants, Inc</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dean Emeritus and International Nursing Consultant</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vlambert@mcg.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Clinton E. Lambert, PhD, RN, CS, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To cross-culturally compare workplace stressors, ways of coping and demographic characteristics as predictors of physical and mental health among hospital nurses in Japan, Thailand, South Korea and the USA (Hawaii). Design: Self-report survey. Sample, Setting &amp; Years: Hospital nurses (n = 1554) working between March 2002 and January 2003. Variables Studied: Independent variables: a) workplace stressors, b) ways of coping and, c) demographic characteristics. Dependent variables: a) level of physical health and b) level of mental health. Method: Administration of four valid and reliable questionnaires (Demographic Questionnaire, &ldquo;Nursing Stress Scale,&rdquo; &ldquo;Ways of Coping Questionnaire,&rdquo; and SF-36 Health Survey&rdquo;) translated into the nurses&rsquo; native language. Findings: Workload and number of people in the household were predictors for Japanese nurses&rsquo; physical health, while likelihood to leave the current nursing position, lack of support and escape-avoidance were predictors for their mental health. Seeking social support and likelihood to leave the current nursing position were predictors of South Korean nurses&rsquo; physical health, while age, distancing, workload, likelihood to leave the current nursing position and planful problem solving predicted mental health. Number of people residing in the household, number of years worked as a nurse and level of household income constituted predictors of Thai nurses&rsquo; physical health, while conflict with physicians, likelihood to leave the current nursing position, escape-avoidance and lack of support were predictors of mental health. Workload, likelihood to leave the current nursing position, highest educational level and escape-avoidance were predictors of the USA (Hawaii) nurses&rsquo; physical health, while escape-avoidance, conflict with other nurses, likelihood to leave the current nursing position, positive reappraisal, lack of support, distancing and workload predicted mental health. Conclusions: Nurses demonstrate cross-cultural similarities in predictors of physical and mental health. Implications: Unless role stress issues are confronted, hospital nurses&rsquo; physical and mental health will continue to be compromised.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:47:01Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:47:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.