2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152720
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Characteristics of Hypertensive Parent and Grandparent Caregivers
Abstract:
Characteristics of Hypertensive Parent and Grandparent Caregivers
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Long, Jacquelyn Y., MSN, PNP, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Doctoral Candidate
Co-Authors:Olivia G.M. Washington, PhD, APRN, BC, NP, LPC, RN; Nancy T. Artinian, PhD, RN, BC, FAHA; Peter Lichtenberg, PhD, ABPP
Purpose: The AHA ranks cardiovascular disease as the primary cause of death among African Americans. Because stress is a major factor in hypertension, research on parenting stressors, lifestyle behaviors, and coping of caregiving adults with hypertension is important. The specific aims of this study are to describe urban hypertensive African Americans caring for children/grandchildren and examine perceived parenting stressors relative to hypertension management. Framework: Neuman’s Systems Model Subjects: Sixty-five urban hypertensive African Americans volunteers with parenting responsibilities participating in the larger study will participate in this study. Methods: This descriptive study was nested within a larger randomized controlled trial. Baseline descriptive data plus the Index of Parental Attitudes (IPA) were collected by structured interview. Data was analyzed using frequency distributions and measures of central tendency and dispersion. Results: Participants ranged in age from 22 to 82 years, were mostly female (63.1%), and had from 1 to 9 children. All participants were responsible for care of 1 or more dependent children. Most participants were sedentary, smoked, and overweight. The mean systolic blood pressure was 157.14 (SD=21.98) and the mean diastolic blood pressure was 88.73 (SD=15.01). The average IPA scores were 11.83 (SD=9.38), with a range from 0 to 42, with higher scores indicating greater parental stress. Some (10%) participants had a clinically significant problem with the parent/grandparent-child relationship. Conclusions: The present study is the first in a line of research studies to develop a knowledge base about the influence of parental attitudes on parents’/grandparents’ hypertension outcomes. Based on the results of this study, further studies for possible interventions will be tested to aid parents/grandparents better cope with the stressors of caring for themselves and their children. This study contributes to nursing in that it provides an assessment of potential health consequences of low-income, urban parents/grandparents caring for children.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCharacteristics of Hypertensive Parent and Grandparent Caregiversen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152720-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Characteristics of Hypertensive Parent and Grandparent Caregivers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Long, Jacquelyn Y., MSN, PNP, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jlong@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Olivia G.M. Washington, PhD, APRN, BC, NP, LPC, RN; Nancy T. Artinian, PhD, RN, BC, FAHA; Peter Lichtenberg, PhD, ABPP</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The AHA ranks cardiovascular disease as the primary cause of death among African Americans. Because stress is a major factor in hypertension, research on parenting stressors, lifestyle behaviors, and coping of caregiving adults with hypertension is important. The specific aims of this study are to describe urban hypertensive African Americans caring for children/grandchildren and examine perceived parenting stressors relative to hypertension management. Framework: Neuman&rsquo;s Systems Model Subjects: Sixty-five urban hypertensive African Americans volunteers with parenting responsibilities participating in the larger study will participate in this study. Methods: This descriptive study was nested within a larger randomized controlled trial. Baseline descriptive data plus the Index of Parental Attitudes (IPA) were collected by structured interview. Data was analyzed using frequency distributions and measures of central tendency and dispersion. Results: Participants ranged in age from 22 to 82 years, were mostly female (63.1%), and had from 1 to 9 children. All participants were responsible for care of 1 or more dependent children. Most participants were sedentary, smoked, and overweight. The mean systolic blood pressure was 157.14 (SD=21.98) and the mean diastolic blood pressure was 88.73 (SD=15.01). The average IPA scores were 11.83 (SD=9.38), with a range from 0 to 42, with higher scores indicating greater parental stress. Some (10%) participants had a clinically significant problem with the parent/grandparent-child relationship. Conclusions: The present study is the first in a line of research studies to develop a knowledge base about the influence of parental attitudes on parents&rsquo;/grandparents&rsquo; hypertension outcomes. Based on the results of this study, further studies for possible interventions will be tested to aid parents/grandparents better cope with the stressors of caring for themselves and their children. This study contributes to nursing in that it provides an assessment of potential health consequences of low-income, urban parents/grandparents caring for children.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:47:13Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:47:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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