2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152721
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Wound Care in Home Health Care--Resource Use and Outcomes
Abstract:
Wound Care in Home Health Care--Resource Use and Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Madigan, Elizabeth A., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Associate Dean/Associate Professor
Objective: Wound care is a common nursing intervention in home healthcare practice. Despite recommendations that the standard of care should be moist wound healing, there are reports that home healthcare nurses continue to use wet-to-dry dressing techniques. The purpose of the study was to evaluate wound care techniques for patients with pressure ulcers (PU’s) and stasis ulcers (SU’s) and evaluate outcomes including healing and resource use. Design: Prospective prevalence study Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Data were collected on all patients with PU’s and SU’s who were admitted during October 2001from 4 home healthcare agencies. There were 91 subjects, mean age was 73.2 years, 63% were female and 25% were of minority ethnicity. More than 2/3rds had PU’s (69.2%), 35% had SU’s and 4% had both types of ulcers. Variables: The independent variable was the type of dressing technique and the outcomes were healing status at the end of care and the number of home visits provided. Methods: Data were collected from the clinical records. Findings: Almost half (48%) of the patients received moist wound care dressing techniques; 18% received wet-to-dry dressing care and the remainder had no dressing required. For the patients for whom complete data were available, healing occurred in 95% of the patients with PU’s and 93% of patients with SU’s. There was no significant difference by type of dressing for either group. Patients with SU’s who received moist wound care required significantly fewer home visits than those receiving wet to dry care (18.1 versus 43.4 visits, respectively). Conclusions: Wet-to-dry dressings continue to be used despite recommendations for moist wound healing in a sizable minority of home healthcare patients. While the healing outcomes are equivalent in this sample, resource use is very different suggesting that more efficient care can be provided by use of moist wound care techniques.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWound Care in Home Health Care--Resource Use and Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152721-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Wound Care in Home Health Care--Resource Use and Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Madigan, Elizabeth A., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean/Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">madigan@case.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Wound care is a common nursing intervention in home healthcare practice. Despite recommendations that the standard of care should be moist wound healing, there are reports that home healthcare nurses continue to use wet-to-dry dressing techniques. The purpose of the study was to evaluate wound care techniques for patients with pressure ulcers (PU&rsquo;s) and stasis ulcers (SU&rsquo;s) and evaluate outcomes including healing and resource use. Design: Prospective prevalence study Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Data were collected on all patients with PU&rsquo;s and SU&rsquo;s who were admitted during October 2001from 4 home healthcare agencies. There were 91 subjects, mean age was 73.2 years, 63% were female and 25% were of minority ethnicity. More than 2/3rds had PU&rsquo;s (69.2%), 35% had SU&rsquo;s and 4% had both types of ulcers. Variables: The independent variable was the type of dressing technique and the outcomes were healing status at the end of care and the number of home visits provided. Methods: Data were collected from the clinical records. Findings: Almost half (48%) of the patients received moist wound care dressing techniques; 18% received wet-to-dry dressing care and the remainder had no dressing required. For the patients for whom complete data were available, healing occurred in 95% of the patients with PU&rsquo;s and 93% of patients with SU&rsquo;s. There was no significant difference by type of dressing for either group. Patients with SU&rsquo;s who received moist wound care required significantly fewer home visits than those receiving wet to dry care (18.1 versus 43.4 visits, respectively). Conclusions: Wet-to-dry dressings continue to be used despite recommendations for moist wound healing in a sizable minority of home healthcare patients. While the healing outcomes are equivalent in this sample, resource use is very different suggesting that more efficient care can be provided by use of moist wound care techniques.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:47:15Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:47:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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