How Do Families Derive Positive Benefits From the Childhood Cancer Experience?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152722
Type:
Presentation
Title:
How Do Families Derive Positive Benefits From the Childhood Cancer Experience?
Abstract:
How Do Families Derive Positive Benefits From the Childhood Cancer Experience?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:McCubbin, Marilyn, RN, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Hawaii at Manoa
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Joel Wish, PhD; Stephanie Farrell, PhD; Andrea Urbon, MSSW; Ken DeSantes, MD
Purpose: Childhood cancer survivors and their families are a unique and growing population. Improved survival rates have been brought about by more potentially toxic and intense treatment regimens with the long term effects on both the child and family still being determined. The overall purpose of this research was to determine how parents and families have adapted to the experience of childhood cancer and what contributes to their resiliency and recovery. Theoretical Base: The study was guided by the Resiliency Model of Family Stress, Adjustment and Adaptation (McCubbin & McCubbin, 1996); will focus on the appraisal processes in the Model and how families were able to derive some positive benefits from this traumatic situation. Design,Sample & Setting: Parents in 20 families (20 mothers, 13 fathers) represnting a subsample of a larger study of 108 families of childhood cancer survivors were selected using maximum variation sampling and interviewed in depth about their childhood cancer experience. The child had been diagnosed at least five years before, completed cancer treatment at least two years before, and was currently cancer free. Children had been treated at two U.S. sites in Wisconsin and California. Analysis: Data analyses were conducted by the interdisciplinary team using interpretive description (Thorne, Kirkham, & MacDonald-Emes, 1997). Results: There were no demographic or child cancer differences between this subsample and the larger study sample. Three processes were found to be involved in deriving positive benefits: (1) Reframing the stress and adversity of childhood cancer and any treatment late effects; (2) Re-evaluating by re-examing life perspective and values; and (3) Re-prioritizing individual and family goals. Additional specific positive benefits will be included. Implications: Fostering appraisal processes that support positive benefits from the childhood cancer experience can build a community of more resilient families in this population group.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHow Do Families Derive Positive Benefits From the Childhood Cancer Experience?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152722-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">How Do Families Derive Positive Benefits From the Childhood Cancer Experience?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McCubbin, Marilyn, RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Hawaii at Manoa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mccubbin@hawaii.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Joel Wish, PhD; Stephanie Farrell, PhD; Andrea Urbon, MSSW; Ken DeSantes, MD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Childhood cancer survivors and their families are a unique and growing population. Improved survival rates have been brought about by more potentially toxic and intense treatment regimens with the long term effects on both the child and family still being determined. The overall purpose of this research was to determine how parents and families have adapted to the experience of childhood cancer and what contributes to their resiliency and recovery. Theoretical Base: The study was guided by the Resiliency Model of Family Stress, Adjustment and Adaptation (McCubbin &amp; McCubbin, 1996); will focus on the appraisal processes in the Model and how families were able to derive some positive benefits from this traumatic situation. Design,Sample &amp; Setting: Parents in 20 families (20 mothers, 13 fathers) represnting a subsample of a larger study of 108 families of childhood cancer survivors were selected using maximum variation sampling and interviewed in depth about their childhood cancer experience. The child had been diagnosed at least five years before, completed cancer treatment at least two years before, and was currently cancer free. Children had been treated at two U.S. sites in Wisconsin and California. Analysis: Data analyses were conducted by the interdisciplinary team using interpretive description (Thorne, Kirkham, &amp; MacDonald-Emes, 1997). Results: There were no demographic or child cancer differences between this subsample and the larger study sample. Three processes were found to be involved in deriving positive benefits: (1) Reframing the stress and adversity of childhood cancer and any treatment late effects; (2) Re-evaluating by re-examing life perspective and values; and (3) Re-prioritizing individual and family goals. Additional specific positive benefits will be included. Implications: Fostering appraisal processes that support positive benefits from the childhood cancer experience can build a community of more resilient families in this population group.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:47:17Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:47:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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