2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152732
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of Community-Based Farm Safety Education for Children
Abstract:
Evaluation of Community-Based Farm Safety Education for Children
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Reed, Deborah, PhD, MSPH, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kentucky
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Deborah Claunch, BBA; Mary Kay Rayens, PhD; Debbie Slusher, N/A
Objective: Annually, 32,800 children are injured on U.S. farms. This study evaluated the effectiveness of Farm Safety 4 Just Kids (FS4JK) day camps in improving knowledge of selected farm safety issues. Design: Closed cohort, repeated measure survey using a nonrandom sample. Population: Six camps in five states across the United States were selected for evaluation. Selection was based on the historical involvement in FS4JK day camps, anticipated number of attendees in grades 4 and 5, differences in farm type, and geographic location. All children who attended the selected camps were eligible to participate. Variables studied: Safety knowledge about tractors, animals, and powered equipment. Method: The investigators designed a 33-item pre- and post-test and administered it to children who attended the camps. Pre-tests were completed the day before the camp; post-tests were completed at the end of the camp day. Adults read the questions aloud to the children to keep them on task and increase comprehension. Findings: Of the 1,347 children who attended the selected camps, 1,220 (90.6%) completed both the pre- and post-tests. Overall, knowledge increased significantly (p Conclusions: Farm safety day camps are effective in improving children’s knowledge about farm safety. Implications: Community-led farm safety day camps may be a venue to positively influence children’s knowledge about farm injury risks. Coupled with other programs for parents and farm families, these efforts may reduce the prevalence of child farm injuries.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of Community-Based Farm Safety Education for Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152732-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evaluation of Community-Based Farm Safety Education for Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Reed, Deborah, PhD, MSPH, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kentucky</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dbreed01@pop.uky.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Deborah Claunch, BBA; Mary Kay Rayens, PhD; Debbie Slusher, N/A</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Annually, 32,800 children are injured on U.S. farms. This study evaluated the effectiveness of Farm Safety 4 Just Kids (FS4JK) day camps in improving knowledge of selected farm safety issues. Design: Closed cohort, repeated measure survey using a nonrandom sample. Population: Six camps in five states across the United States were selected for evaluation. Selection was based on the historical involvement in FS4JK day camps, anticipated number of attendees in grades 4 and 5, differences in farm type, and geographic location. All children who attended the selected camps were eligible to participate. Variables studied: Safety knowledge about tractors, animals, and powered equipment. Method: The investigators designed a 33-item pre- and post-test and administered it to children who attended the camps. Pre-tests were completed the day before the camp; post-tests were completed at the end of the camp day. Adults read the questions aloud to the children to keep them on task and increase comprehension. Findings: Of the 1,347 children who attended the selected camps, 1,220 (90.6%) completed both the pre- and post-tests. Overall, knowledge increased significantly (p Conclusions: Farm safety day camps are effective in improving children&rsquo;s knowledge about farm safety. Implications: Community-led farm safety day camps may be a venue to positively influence children&rsquo;s knowledge about farm injury risks. Coupled with other programs for parents and farm families, these efforts may reduce the prevalence of child farm injuries.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:47:41Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:47:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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