2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152740
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Building Community Through Partnerships on Service Learning Projects
Abstract:
Building Community Through Partnerships on Service Learning Projects
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Sternas, Kathleen A., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Seton Hall University
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Mary Ann Scharf, EdD
Objectives: High-risk populations suffer significant health risks. This presentation describes skills for building community through partnerships on service learning projects that meet the health needs of high-risk populations, and benefit students and community partners. Design: A descriptive design was used. Sample: Traditional (n= 61) and accelerated (second degree, n=55) community health nursing students and 23 agency partners participated. Variables Studied: cultural awareness; competence in assessment and interventions; collaboration with culturally diverse professionals; leadership; Internet abilities; interest in community nursing; usefulness of project findings; benefits to students and community partners. Methods: Students selected a topic from a list developed by partners and faculty for projects and received mentoring. Topics included: asthma; homeless; nutrition, prenatal mothers, immunizations, alcohol, smoking; obesity, lead poisoning; safety; teenager healthy relationships; chronic and communicable diseases;polypharmacy; bioterrorism. Students and partners completed evaluations measuring project outcomes. Findings: Skills in developing and sustaining partnerships include: mutuality; trust;respect;commitment;identifying strengths;working on areas needing improvement;decision-making; communication, acknowledgement of partnership accomplishments. Evaluations from 2002 indicated 100% of traditional and accelerated students agreed experiences promoted cultural awareness; 96.88% of both groups had worked with diverse professionals; 100% traditional and 96.88% accelerated reported increased competence in assessing and planning community interventions and increased leadership skills; 93.8% traditional and 100% accelerated had improved Internet abilities. Interest in working in communities increased. Student' benefits included: expertise in caring for high-risk populations, identifying barriers to healthcare; applying critical thinking skills. Partner evaluations: 100% agreed assessments and interventions met community needs,findings were useful in program planning,writing grants. Partner benefits: new health programs; increased knowledge about health and resources. Conclusions: Service learning helps meet health needs of high-risk populations and increases community-based knowledge of students. Implications: Important to educate nurses and students about skills for building community and benefits of partnerships for meeting assessment and intervention needs of high-risk communities.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBuilding Community Through Partnerships on Service Learning Projectsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152740-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Building Community Through Partnerships on Service Learning Projects</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sternas, Kathleen A., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Seton Hall University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sternaka@shu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary Ann Scharf, EdD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: High-risk populations suffer significant health risks. This presentation describes skills for building community through partnerships on service learning projects that meet the health needs of high-risk populations, and benefit students and community partners. Design: A descriptive design was used. Sample: Traditional (n= 61) and accelerated (second degree, n=55) community health nursing students and 23 agency partners participated. Variables Studied: cultural awareness; competence in assessment and interventions; collaboration with culturally diverse professionals; leadership; Internet abilities; interest in community nursing; usefulness of project findings; benefits to students and community partners. Methods: Students selected a topic from a list developed by partners and faculty for projects and received mentoring. Topics included: asthma; homeless; nutrition, prenatal mothers, immunizations, alcohol, smoking; obesity, lead poisoning; safety; teenager healthy relationships; chronic and communicable diseases;polypharmacy; bioterrorism. Students and partners completed evaluations measuring project outcomes. Findings: Skills in developing and sustaining partnerships include: mutuality; trust;respect;commitment;identifying strengths;working on areas needing improvement;decision-making; communication, acknowledgement of partnership accomplishments. Evaluations from 2002 indicated 100% of traditional and accelerated students agreed experiences promoted cultural awareness; 96.88% of both groups had worked with diverse professionals; 100% traditional and 96.88% accelerated reported increased competence in assessing and planning community interventions and increased leadership skills; 93.8% traditional and 100% accelerated had improved Internet abilities. Interest in working in communities increased. Student' benefits included: expertise in caring for high-risk populations, identifying barriers to healthcare; applying critical thinking skills. Partner evaluations: 100% agreed assessments and interventions met community needs,findings were useful in program planning,writing grants. Partner benefits: new health programs; increased knowledge about health and resources. Conclusions: Service learning helps meet health needs of high-risk populations and increases community-based knowledge of students. Implications: Important to educate nurses and students about skills for building community and benefits of partnerships for meeting assessment and intervention needs of high-risk communities.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:47:59Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:47:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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