2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152742
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Right Nurse and the Right Environment Improve System Outcomes
Abstract:
The Right Nurse and the Right Environment Improve System Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Thomson, Donna, BScN, MScN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Toronto
Title:doctoral candidate
Co-Authors:Linda O'Brien-Pallas, RN, PhD; Linda McGillis Hall, RN, PhD; Sping Wang, PhD; Xiaoqiang Li, PhD; Raquel M Meyer, RN, PhD, Student
Objective: This paper describes how system inputs and throughputs influence P/U, delay/completion of nursing interventions, absenteeism, length of stay, quality of nursing and patient care, and cost per Resource Intensity Weight (RIW). Design: As above in Patient Outcomes Population, Sample, Setting: In total 8113 patient days of data and as above Concepts and variables measured: As described in Abstract 1 Methods: As described in Abstract 2 Results: One of the most interesting findings in this study is the level of nursing P/U at which cost and quality indicators begin to decline. This study suggests that better cost outcomes can be achieved when unit staffing allows utilization rates around 85% ± 5%. Lower costs per RIW were associated with increased use of step-down units, care by nurses with clinical expertise, and physically healthier nurses. Higher costs per RIW were more likely when surgical patients attended pre-operative and post-operative education. The ratings of quality of nursing care were influenced by nurses’ ratings of quality of patient care, job satisfaction, ratings of clinical expertise, frequency of shift change, and quality of nurse-physician relationships. The ratings of patient care quality were influenced by the proportion of RN worked hours, nurses with BScN or above, number of interventions delayed, ratings of clinical expertise, degree of autonomy, and ratings of quality of nursing care. P/U was influenced by the proportions of emotionally exhausted and mentally healthy nurses on the unit, nurse patient ratio, pure cardiology patient mix, more time needed to provide care, and autonomy. Conclusion: Nurses who are clinical experts, healthy, satisfied and BScN prepared and enough nurses to meet demand will lower cost and increase quality. Implication: Staffing with right number and type of nurses will create better system outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Right Nurse and the Right Environment Improve System Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152742-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Right Nurse and the Right Environment Improve System Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Thomson, Donna, BScN, MScN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Toronto</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">doctoral candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dthomson@stpetes.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Linda O'Brien-Pallas, RN, PhD; Linda McGillis Hall, RN, PhD; Sping Wang, PhD; Xiaoqiang Li, PhD; Raquel M Meyer, RN, PhD, Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This paper describes how system inputs and throughputs influence P/U, delay/completion of nursing interventions, absenteeism, length of stay, quality of nursing and patient care, and cost per Resource Intensity Weight (RIW). Design: As above in Patient Outcomes Population, Sample, Setting: In total 8113 patient days of data and as above Concepts and variables measured: As described in Abstract 1 Methods: As described in Abstract 2 Results: One of the most interesting findings in this study is the level of nursing P/U at which cost and quality indicators begin to decline. This study suggests that better cost outcomes can be achieved when unit staffing allows utilization rates around 85% &plusmn; 5%. Lower costs per RIW were associated with increased use of step-down units, care by nurses with clinical expertise, and physically healthier nurses. Higher costs per RIW were more likely when surgical patients attended pre-operative and post-operative education. The ratings of quality of nursing care were influenced by nurses&rsquo; ratings of quality of patient care, job satisfaction, ratings of clinical expertise, frequency of shift change, and quality of nurse-physician relationships. The ratings of patient care quality were influenced by the proportion of RN worked hours, nurses with BScN or above, number of interventions delayed, ratings of clinical expertise, degree of autonomy, and ratings of quality of nursing care. P/U was influenced by the proportions of emotionally exhausted and mentally healthy nurses on the unit, nurse patient ratio, pure cardiology patient mix, more time needed to provide care, and autonomy. Conclusion: Nurses who are clinical experts, healthy, satisfied and BScN prepared and enough nurses to meet demand will lower cost and increase quality. Implication: Staffing with right number and type of nurses will create better system outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:48:03Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:48:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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