2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152743
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Preventing Postpartum Depression
Abstract:
Preventing Postpartum Depression
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Ugarriza, Doris, ARNP, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Miami School of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Objective: The primary aim of this study was to investigate the cultural practices of non-postpartum depressed mothers. We compared and contrasted the culturally derived postpartum prevention practices of African-American, Anglo-American, and Cuban-American mothers. Design: Using snowball and network sampling, we interviewed postpartum women from three cultural groups and applied content analysis techniques to the resultant verbatim text. Population, Sample, Setting, Year: The sample comprised 90 participants, 30 each from African-American, Anglo-American, and Cuban-American postpartum mothers drawn from the Miami-Dade County area during the years 1998-2003. Concepts: The major variables were the culturally derived practices used by new mothers and their families which serve to prevent the development of postpartum depression. Methods: We interviewed 90 postpartum women who had a baby between three months and one year prior to the interview. We derived our topics from the Stern & Kruckman postpartum depression prevention criteria. These criteria are the identified practices that cultures with low incidences of postpartum depression have in place: a) protective measures reflecting the vulnerability of the new mother; b) a defined postpartum period; c) social seclusion; d) mandated rest; e) assistance with tasks; and e) social recognition of the new status of the mother. Interviews were conducted by telephone using audio-taping equipment. We transcribed the interviews verbatim and content analyzed the text using latent and manifest analyses. The results were tabulated using descriptive statistics. Findings: Mothers not experiencing postpartum depression had been the recipients of one or more of the preventive cultural practices. In place practices varied among cultural groups. Conclusion: It is possible to identify culturally relevant postpartum depression prevention practices using the Stern & Kruckman model. Implications: We now know what practices are beneficial for these three groups and can start to educate mothers and their families on the value of these practices.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePreventing Postpartum Depressionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152743-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Preventing Postpartum Depression</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ugarriza, Doris, ARNP, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Miami School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dugarriza@miami.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The primary aim of this study was to investigate the cultural practices of non-postpartum depressed mothers. We compared and contrasted the culturally derived postpartum prevention practices of African-American, Anglo-American, and Cuban-American mothers. Design: Using snowball and network sampling, we interviewed postpartum women from three cultural groups and applied content analysis techniques to the resultant verbatim text. Population, Sample, Setting, Year: The sample comprised 90 participants, 30 each from African-American, Anglo-American, and Cuban-American postpartum mothers drawn from the Miami-Dade County area during the years 1998-2003. Concepts: The major variables were the culturally derived practices used by new mothers and their families which serve to prevent the development of postpartum depression. Methods: We interviewed 90 postpartum women who had a baby between three months and one year prior to the interview. We derived our topics from the Stern &amp; Kruckman postpartum depression prevention criteria. These criteria are the identified practices that cultures with low incidences of postpartum depression have in place: a) protective measures reflecting the vulnerability of the new mother; b) a defined postpartum period; c) social seclusion; d) mandated rest; e) assistance with tasks; and e) social recognition of the new status of the mother. Interviews were conducted by telephone using audio-taping equipment. We transcribed the interviews verbatim and content analyzed the text using latent and manifest analyses. The results were tabulated using descriptive statistics. Findings: Mothers not experiencing postpartum depression had been the recipients of one or more of the preventive cultural practices. In place practices varied among cultural groups. Conclusion: It is possible to identify culturally relevant postpartum depression prevention practices using the Stern &amp; Kruckman model. Implications: We now know what practices are beneficial for these three groups and can start to educate mothers and their families on the value of these practices.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:48:06Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:48:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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