2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152744
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Strategies to Improve Blood Glucose in Chinese Immigrants
Abstract:
Strategies to Improve Blood Glucose in Chinese Immigrants
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Wang, Chen-Yen, ANP-BC, CDE
P.I. Institution Name:University of Hawaii at Manoa, School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Alain Chan, RN
Prevalence of diabetes among Chinese increases after immigration. Obstacles to achieve optimal diabetes management in Chinese immigrants indicates that traditional American diabetes management strategies remain difficult for immigrants to access, largely due to language barriers, difficulty in lifestyle transitions, financial constraints, incomplete acculturation, and the use of traditional Chinese medicine and therapy. Purpose The first purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a culturally appropriate diabetes management program tailored to Chinese immigrants with type-2 diabetes. The second purpose was to examine outcomes of the intervention. Method Forty eligible subjects were recruited via network sampling, physician referrals or newspaper advertisements to participate in this 10-session program. Data regarding the use of Chinese medicine and therapy were collected by interviewing at baseline. Feasibility and acceptability of the program were evaluated by percentage of participants meeting the course objectives and participants’ satisfaction with the program. Outcomes measures included the body weight, blood pressure and HbA1c levels which were measured at the beginning, the end and three months following program completion. Results Eight percent of the participants concurrently used Chinese medicine and Western medicine. Results revealed that 75% of the participants understood the course content, while 70% of them were able to identify and demonstrate various diabetes management skills. All participants were satisfied with the program. Regarding outcome variables, 43.6% of the participants lost more than 5 pounds, had an average of 1% reduction in HbA1c level and reduction in blood pressure at 3 months post program completion. Conclusion The favorable outcomes of this culturally tailored diabetes program indicate that it is a feasible and acceptable tool in reducing the health disparities in the Chinese immigrant population and may be adapted for use in other ethnic groups.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStrategies to Improve Blood Glucose in Chinese Immigrantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152744-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Strategies to Improve Blood Glucose in Chinese Immigrants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wang, Chen-Yen, ANP-BC, CDE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Hawaii at Manoa, School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">chenwang@hawaii.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Alain Chan, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Prevalence of diabetes among Chinese increases after immigration. Obstacles to achieve optimal diabetes management in Chinese immigrants indicates that traditional American diabetes management strategies remain difficult for immigrants to access, largely due to language barriers, difficulty in lifestyle transitions, financial constraints, incomplete acculturation, and the use of traditional Chinese medicine and therapy. Purpose The first purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a culturally appropriate diabetes management program tailored to Chinese immigrants with type-2 diabetes. The second purpose was to examine outcomes of the intervention. Method Forty eligible subjects were recruited via network sampling, physician referrals or newspaper advertisements to participate in this 10-session program. Data regarding the use of Chinese medicine and therapy were collected by interviewing at baseline. Feasibility and acceptability of the program were evaluated by percentage of participants meeting the course objectives and participants&rsquo; satisfaction with the program. Outcomes measures included the body weight, blood pressure and HbA1c levels which were measured at the beginning, the end and three months following program completion. Results Eight percent of the participants concurrently used Chinese medicine and Western medicine. Results revealed that 75% of the participants understood the course content, while 70% of them were able to identify and demonstrate various diabetes management skills. All participants were satisfied with the program. Regarding outcome variables, 43.6% of the participants lost more than 5 pounds, had an average of 1% reduction in HbA1c level and reduction in blood pressure at 3 months post program completion. Conclusion The favorable outcomes of this culturally tailored diabetes program indicate that it is a feasible and acceptable tool in reducing the health disparities in the Chinese immigrant population and may be adapted for use in other ethnic groups.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:48:09Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:48:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.