2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152745
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mother-Daughter Relationships Within the Care Process of Dementia
Abstract:
Mother-Daughter Relationships Within the Care Process of Dementia
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Ward-Griffin, Catherine, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Western Ontario
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Nancy Ann Bol, RN, BScN, MScN
Background: Most family caregiving research has relied solely on the perspective of the caregiver but has rarely examined the perceptions of the elder in the care process. Inattention to care recipients’ perspectives renders them passive participants in the care process. If we are to broaden our understanding of the complexities of the care process of AD, future research needs to focus on caregiving as a dyadic process, one that considers both perspectives of the caregiver and care recipient. However, we know very little about the specific relationships between adult daughters and their mothers with AD, how their relationship changes over time, or how the care process influences their health and well-being. Methodology: Grounded in a feminist interpretive orientation that acknowledges the constructed and contextual nature of health and illness experiences (Thorne, Kirkham & MacDonald-Emes, 1997), a qualitative descriptive inquiry was used to explore the subjective perceptions and experiences of adult daughters and their mothers diagnosed with Alzheimer Disease (AD). This study also took a longitudinal approach in order to determine changes in the relationship between mothers with AD and their daughters, and in their health and well-being. A diverse sample of 20 community dwelling older women with mild to moderate cognitive impairment and their daughters was obtained. All participants completed two audiotaped interviews, approximately 6-9 months apart. The major procedures for qualitative analysis followed the guidelines of Lofland and Lofland (1995). Findings and Implications: Preliminary analysis revealed key themes of gratitude, reciprocity, resentment, autonomy and dependency. We need to be especially aware of the experiences and needs of both care recipients and caregivers so adequate supports and services are available to foster healthy family relationships. Study findings may help identify those practices, programs and polices necessary to support individuals with dementia and their families.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMother-Daughter Relationships Within the Care Process of Dementiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152745-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Mother-Daughter Relationships Within the Care Process of Dementia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ward-Griffin, Catherine, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Western Ontario</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cwg@uwo.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Nancy Ann Bol, RN, BScN, MScN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Most family caregiving research has relied solely on the perspective of the caregiver but has rarely examined the perceptions of the elder in the care process. Inattention to care recipients&rsquo; perspectives renders them passive participants in the care process. If we are to broaden our understanding of the complexities of the care process of AD, future research needs to focus on caregiving as a dyadic process, one that considers both perspectives of the caregiver and care recipient. However, we know very little about the specific relationships between adult daughters and their mothers with AD, how their relationship changes over time, or how the care process influences their health and well-being. Methodology: Grounded in a feminist interpretive orientation that acknowledges the constructed and contextual nature of health and illness experiences (Thorne, Kirkham &amp; MacDonald-Emes, 1997), a qualitative descriptive inquiry was used to explore the subjective perceptions and experiences of adult daughters and their mothers diagnosed with Alzheimer Disease (AD). This study also took a longitudinal approach in order to determine changes in the relationship between mothers with AD and their daughters, and in their health and well-being. A diverse sample of 20 community dwelling older women with mild to moderate cognitive impairment and their daughters was obtained. All participants completed two audiotaped interviews, approximately 6-9 months apart. The major procedures for qualitative analysis followed the guidelines of Lofland and Lofland (1995). Findings and Implications: Preliminary analysis revealed key themes of gratitude, reciprocity, resentment, autonomy and dependency. We need to be especially aware of the experiences and needs of both care recipients and caregivers so adequate supports and services are available to foster healthy family relationships. Study findings may help identify those practices, programs and polices necessary to support individuals with dementia and their families.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:48:11Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:48:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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